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Nov
14
comment Does a brand-new bike bought online need a service before riding it?
Yeah, it was as recently as this year. John Degenkolb won Paris-Roubaix on a Defy.
Nov
14
comment Does a brand-new bike bought online need a service before riding it?
Just as an aside @andy256, the Defy is a decent early-season bike which won one of the Spring Classics (was it Paris-Roubaix?) not so long ago. Obviously I don't know what group the Op has chosen, but potentially he has a top notch ride there.
Nov
13
comment Does a brand-new bike bought online need a service before riding it?
Good to hear that you're sorted. That mechanic has done himself a favour because when you are ready for a service, you'll choose him as a no-brainer....all for 10 minutes effort today. Remember that keeping your chain lubricated and your tyres pumped up are not one-off things, they're something you need to check every couple of weeks or so. So be prepared for some minor maintenance before you take it back to the mechanic
Nov
13
comment Does a brand-new bike bought online need a service before riding it?
The trouble is, you've come to a forum of bike enthusiasts, I reckon most of us look after our bikes, so many of us will see this as a loaded question. If you have a problem using an LBS for a service - and that will soon include adjusting cables as they bed in to your new bike - I'd suggest getting a book on bike maintenance, and doing it yourself. Bear in mind that if you go down that route, you'll have a relatively large initial outlay on appropriate tools.
Nov
13
comment Storing bicycle in a shed for the winter
+1. I'm pretty sure that this question, or something quite similar, has been asked before. But this answer appears to be unique and is an almost canonical answer regarding the properties of carbon fibre ate extreme temperatures
Nov
12
comment Typical Torque Values For Bicycles
yeah, I'd back both the numbers and the approach. This is pretty much what I've done. Most of the time the big one sits in a corner.
Nov
11
comment Are CO2 cartridges feasable for use on fat bike tires?
The cartridges I used to use (these would have been 16g) were advertised as sufficient to pump up a 700x23 road tyre to 100psi or so, and a 26x2" to 60psi ish. So basically, one cartridge would give you a near-ideal amount of inflation. For a fat bike I'm guessing that you'd need multiple cartridges. Oh, and from experience, you're right to keep the pump ;-) I'm going by what I read in the blurb, I haven't done the calculations.
Nov
11
revised Is my pump faulty or my tyre?
added a link to the manufacturer's url
Nov
11
comment Is my pump faulty or my tyre?
okay, I see that pump has both presta and schrader connections, are you sure you're using the right one? That you hear air hissing suggests that the pump is ok, and the problem is with your technioque - but unfortunately those minature pumps are always a bit crappy. Worst case, do you have a bike shop nearby? Tradition is that they'll have a track pump you can use, and I'm sure if you ask them nicely they'll help you out. A decent track pump would be a good investment btw, and not that much more expensive than what you've just paid.
Nov
11
comment Is my pump faulty or my tyre?
Possible duplicate of What do I do if my bike won't pump with an air pump at all?
Nov
10
comment Fettling issues - slow shifting rear gears while riding
Just thinking about the stresses that are put onto the frame while you're riding, I doubt you can replicate it on a stand. However, if you have a turbo trainer (where you're not moving so its safe to stare down at your pedals for long periods), you can readily see how the force of your spinning makes the frame flex. If it is any consolation I have the same issue - (with my carbon bike) I can get my adjustments 90% there on the stand, but that last 10% has to happen on the road.
Nov
10
comment I want to ride a bike, but its dangerous for me to have weight on my arms
also bikes known as dutch bikes, or dutchies, or sit-up-and-beg bikes. The aim of them all is the same, to move your centre of gravity back towards the saddle (so that your butt is taking your weight), and to bring your back into a more vertical position.
Nov
9
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
5
reviewed Edit Is it ok to use an inner tube that is slightly too large for the tire?
Nov
5
revised Is it ok to use an inner tube that is slightly too large for the tire?
improved title, fixed smaller style problems
Nov
2
comment What to Look for In Gloves for Winter Commuting
Hi, we don't really do product recs on here, but just in terms of general advice, have a look at what some of the main cycling clothing brands are producing. Also, I personally will wear up to three complementary pairs in the coldest weather, so you might easily be looking at more than one pair to be sufficiently warm. You can get base layer gloves, external gloves etc. just like with jerseys or tights.
Oct
31
comment Unidentified “Sigma Mount Compatible” Bike Computer
not a clue what that model is, but Sigma is indeed a company that makes bike computers. I have one of their HRMs. Try looking at www.sigmasport.com/en/produkte/fahrrad-computer
Oct
30
comment Wheel gets stuck
I'm a bit incredulous that rather than examine the wheel (which surely can't be too difficult - how mant things can cause a wheel to stick?), you come onto the internet to ask this question. If you're still confused, try removing the wheel from the bike, does it rotate ok?
Oct
29
reviewed Approve Mountain biking: How to ride in mud?
Oct
28
comment Winter is here, what type of trainer should I get?
well you basically have a choice of a turbo trainer or rollers, but each gives you something different in terms of training. It sounds like you're talking about a turbo, in which case you should see what is available for your budget....bearing in mind you can pay thousands for whizz-bang virtual reality machines