Reputation
882
Top tag
Next privilege 1,000 Rep.
See votes, expandable usercard
Badges
3 11
Newest
 Nice Answer
Impact
~18k people reached

Apr
13
comment Where does the energy loss in cycling go proportionally?
@SGR Sound is covered by "friction losses".
Apr
12
comment How do I revive my front shock?
If it can be taken apart, cleaned, re-lubricated and re-built, that might do it. Otherwise it's junk.
Apr
11
comment 9 speed Shimano shifter with 7 speed drivetrain
The distance needed to shift is controlled by the shifter (if it is indexed!), and the "ratio" of the derailleur. The 9 and the 7 have the same ratio between how much the cage moves and how much the cable moves ((see Rider_X's answer). This means that from the positioning perspective, they are identical. Maybe the 9 has a narrower clearance for the chain through the cage, and less free play in some of its joints. That's about it.
Apr
9
comment What should I use to lubricate a freehub?
A thread-on freewheel wouldn't be lubed because you toss it out once a year or couple thousand kilometers. With the replacement freewheel, you get a new gear cluster and a new ratchet mechanism. And anyway, that mechanism is only in use when you're not pedaling; it doesn't take any load. The thing you might lube in a freewheel system is the hub inside the wheel. Something like, loosen the cones, get the balls out, clean out, re-pack with axle grease, put balls back in, reassemble.
Apr
9
comment What should I use to lubricate a freehub?
Complete nonsense. A penetrant is a component of this kind of product: it refers to some sort of solvent, or mixture of solvents which carry the lubricant into the nooks and crannies. This is very often a good thing. When the solvent evaporates, the oil is left behind. Would you call sprayed acrylic enamel "not a permanent paint, but a penetrant" because it contains lots of VOC's and only a small percentage of resin solids?
Apr
8
revised Use a lock nut on a presta valve?
deleted 838 characters in body
Apr
8
comment Use a lock nut on a presta valve?
@DanielRHicks Is that all that is wrong with my answer? I removed the text about the dust cap and the matter of the Shrader-sized hole. I think that it's still a good way to carry the nut, thwarting the risks alluded to in some of the other answers (which use that as a basis for advising against leaving the part mounted entirely). They got me genuinely worried, so I came up with this solution.
Apr
8
comment Use a lock nut on a presta valve?
@DanielRHicks Dunno. I've seen presta dust caps with the domes broken off. I know of a bike which has an example of this; I will take a picture.
Apr
8
comment Use a lock nut on a presta valve?
@DanielRHicks The nut prevents the cap from moving down farther, so that the tip of the valve won't break the cap. But why would you keep tightening, when the cap is snug against the nut? The nut gives the user a clear target for how far the cap goes.
Apr
8
comment Use a lock nut on a presta valve?
@DanielRHicks > and if it can be overtightened without the nut it can be overtightened with it in place Not in the same way (dome breaking right off the cap).
Apr
8
comment Use a lock nut on a presta valve?
@DanielRHicks Thanks for the pointer to the grommet. Some of those things in the image search are also called glands in electronics (rubber rings that fit holes in sheet metal, protecting cable shields from being cut). I want that now.
Apr
8
revised Use a lock nut on a presta valve?
added 178 characters in body
Apr
8
answered Use a lock nut on a presta valve?
Apr
8
comment Use a lock nut on a presta valve?
@Johnny Ah yes, I see that you did in response to Vorac. That's also who my comment was supposed to be directed at, oops. Precisely: it's not a valve nut problem. Nut or not nut, that valve is at risk in such a situation.
Apr
8
answered single speed mtb chain slipping
Apr
8
comment Use a lock nut on a presta valve?
Pardon me, I'm just trying to work out whether this jamming is inevitable, or the result of operator error, that is all! Knowing this is important to the decision to keep the nut or not (is there a risk which outweighs the benefits). The help that the nut provides could be useful more than once for the same inner tube. If it's there, it's there, you know? You don't have to hunt for it in your road-side toolbox.
Apr
8
comment Use a lock nut on a presta valve?
Your edit is adding a bizarre factor to your answer. There is no need to let air out during inflation to fiddle with the nut. One light tightening upon full inflation is exactly right. I have a hypothesis on jamming process though: if the tire is subject to an "unscheduled deflation", there is a period of tension on the valve. Just like the way it loosens when you're inflating, it of course tightens during deflating (until becoming loose again on full deflation). This episode of tension on the valve could jam the nut. Of course before a scheduled deflation, you completely loosen the nut.
Apr
8
comment Use a lock nut on a presta valve?
How does the nut get jammed? Do you overtighten it before completely inflating the tube, so that too much of the stem protrudes compared to where it should naturally be when the tire is inflated? Then the pull of the rubber puts tension on the nut and jams it? You have to watch for over-tightening during inflation: try to get it so that, from the beginning of inflation, you have no more than the final length of stem sticking out. When it's done, then just finger-tighten it to get it snug. The nut should not be putting tension on the stem and tube! Without tension, how can it jam? (Debris?)
Apr
8
comment Use a lock nut on a presta valve?
It also holds the tire to the rim when you're inserting the inner tube into the tire, and you have the tire halfway mounted on the rim. You can go around and stuff the tire without the annoyance of the opposite side coming out of the tire
Apr
8
comment Use a lock nut on a presta valve?
> removing them if you've got a tubeless setup is a recipe for disaster Not familiar with this, but how so? The stem is just on the rim, and so if you don't have the nut, it can fall inside the tire? Or, worse, can you actually lose air: while the tubeless tire is inflated, and there is no nut, can the valve can be pushed inside, allowing air to escape? (On cars, the valve stem cannot move either way; it has a molded "gland" that grips the rim, or some such)