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May
25
comment Can I use an old cog for my new hub?
No amount of messing around with the chain tension would change the gear ratio of a 17 tooth cog to match what you obtained from a 16 tooth cog. The gear ratio is purely the ratio of the tooth count of the driving gear to the tooth count of the sprocket. As far as the actual chain tension goes, you probably want to to be getting a new chain when changing sprockets anyway.
May
21
comment How much pressure can mountain bike tires take?
The maximum pressure stamped on the sidewall of MTB tire is almost complete garbage.
May
21
comment Why don't brakes come with 'Safety Levers' any more?
Indeed, it's silly to call these things "safety levers", since all the actuators in the diagrams are levers, and brakes are for safety. Thus they are all "safety levers".
May
21
comment Chain slipping off derailleur jockey (need suggestions ASAP)
terminology problem: that is not a jockey wheel The jockey wheel is the one that actually applies pressure to the chain to move it from one cog to another. A disk jockey changes disks; this jockey changes gears. The lower wheel picks up the slack from the chain. It is called the tension wheel.
May
20
comment what kind of grease to use on front shocks
"The reason is that these are subject to high, fast friction and a lot of heat, so you need lubricants that are developed to handle these conditions" -- almost comical in the context of bicycles. What technical lubricant (i.e. not bacon grease or corn oil) cannot handle the pressures or temperatures that occur in some bicycle fork?
May
20
comment How much of a difference will I notice going from a Mountain bike to a road bike?
The commuter bike alluded to in the very last sentence has little to do with what is described in the rest of the answer.
May
20
comment How much of a difference will I notice going from a Mountain bike to a road bike?
There are bikes which combine the more comfortable seating position with smooth tires (but not necessarily very narrow), with some optional suspension (more so nowadays), with lighter frames that take cues from road bikes. These are known as "urban", "commuter" or "touring" bikes and serve people who actually use bikes day in, day out, year round to get from one place to another. (Not to be confused with "cruiser bikes": bicycle shaped props for nostalgic escapades.)
May
20
comment How much of a difference will I notice going from a Mountain bike to a road bike?
It's not the width of the MTB tires and the contact that slows you down. It's the squirming of all those rubber knobs that are constantly being bent out of shape. You haven't made a fair comparison with, say 1.95" or 1.75" smooth, "road slick" tires on your MTB.
May
20
comment How much of a difference will I notice going from a Mountain bike to a road bike?
@Trengot Cannot make head or tail of your comment, or what it is replying to.
Dec
22
comment Are aerodynamic rims worth additional weight?
For normal recreational cycling, you can take the $1500 that would go for a pair of wheels, and buy yourself three very decent bicycles. Or, buy one bicycle and put the rest of the money into an investment fund that, at maturity will be used to replace the bicycle, with the remainder re-invested in preparation for a third bicycle.
Dec
22
comment Are aerodynamic rims worth additional weight?
The missing information here is how the weight is distributed. Any of the extra grams which are in the hub don't matter much as those that are in the rim. The rotational acceleration of mass in the hub is negligible, because it is proportional to the square of the radius. A piece of mass at 13" from centre has 169 times the moment of inertia compared to that same piece of mass at 1" from centre. These weight figures are for the entire built wheel, right? Spokes, hub and all.
Oct
29
comment How to get more tire clearance with caliper brakes?
From the picture it looks like the pads are not sufficiently curved to match the curvature of your wheel diameter. This could be half your problem. Find pads that are more curved.
Aug
27
comment Why isn't my suspension bouncy?
@Jahaziel Seat post supension has the feature that it goes away when you stand on the pedals, leaving only the front suspension. This can be regarded as an advantage. It may be ideal for the user who does mostly road work, and little or no downhill trails.
Aug
27
comment Why isn't my suspension bouncy?
A suspension spring does not return at the same rate as it is displaced: the unsprung mass (wheel plus lower part of the suspension) moves the spring quickly under the sudden impulse of the road irregularity. The spring then moves slowly, since it has to move the much greater sprung mass! Damping is about reducing overshoot, and diminishing the oscillations. Without any damping at all, the suspension is a harmonic oscillator whose oscillations store energy. Shocks are absorbed fine, but the oscillations grow in amplitude as the effect of the shocks accumulates.
Aug
20
comment How much does bike price correspond with maintenance needs?
What is Mm? mega-meter? So 20 Mm is 20,000 Km?
Aug
20
comment 29" freewheel ruined (slipping)
This question is ineffective without added information: age and history of the bike (how many miles on the chain?), and close-up pictures of the drive train.
Aug
20
comment How to lubricate cables?
WD-40 contains lubricant. According to the MSDS it contains "petroleum base oil". Not a lot of it, but it's there. You can see it. Spray the stuff on a surface, let it evaporate and there is a film of oil. This oil is not suitable for every purpose; it works in those situations that call for a light machine oil. There is also no mention of any useful additives (anti-rust, anti-wear). So it's not a great lubricant and its claims of being general-purpose are greatly overstated; but it's a lie to deny that it's a lubricant.
Aug
20
comment How to lubricate cables?
This is something generic put into a container which is labeled as being created specifically for non-coated cables. The idea that you need a myriad of separate lubes for every conceivable purpose is just clever marketing.
Aug
20
comment Can I increase my highest gear ratio?
I have 48-11 on a bike with 24" wheels. I can still mash up some hills in that gear and into some headwind. It is not that high. (It seemed high initially, but from regular use, the thighs beefed up.) I can easily see that 48-12 would be perceived as not high enough on 26" or 27" wheels.
Aug
20
comment Can I increase my highest gear ratio?
12 over 11 is a 9.1% increase; it's not a lot, but it's significant. The 18.2% difference between 13 and 11 is huge; half of huge is still something.