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location Netherlands
age 25
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Jan 7 at 15:49

Jan
7
comment How can I make my bike (and myself) visible at night?
@MattTagg I think you'll have to \@Vorac for that one, since he was the one who made that comment about smooth change lights. Personally I'm not aware of any.
Oct
9
awarded  Supporter
Oct
9
comment Are Z-shaped cranks a good idea?
Any physics student with knowledge of the theory behind τ = r x F can tell you that torque is independent of the shape of the arm used to apply it (only the perpendicular distance to the axis is relevant). Or you can do this thought experiment: This curved bar is rigid. Add another rigid bar between the pedal and the gear axis. Since the construction was rigid and is still rigid, none of the components able to move with respect to each other, this changes nothing. Now remove the curved bar. The construction is still as rigid as before, the dynamics are unchanged.
Oct
20
comment How can I make my bike (and myself) visible at night?
@Tim: Actually, no. Intersections are by far the most dangerous. Side reflectors are really important, precisely because of what Martin says. Without lights and reflectors you are practically invisible at night, and your front and rear lights are really hard to see from the side. Coming from their side, I usually only see people's reflector rims, and nothing much else.
Oct
20
comment How can I make my bike (and myself) visible at night?
@Tim: It definitely draws attention better, but personally when I drive a car I get frustrated at the distracting and blinding effect of a blinking light. I'm not sure it's safer, I see both kinds of lights a lot (well, usually a simple led light has both a blinking and a continuous setting) and both are visible enough. Hard to say what the distraction effect has on road safety.
Oct
20
comment Passing cars on the right, and later merging into their lane
I agree, basically 2. I also use 3 all the time (usual and expected in the Netherlands due to the bicycle-adjusted road layout). It gives you a few seconds to get up to speed and stability before moving over to let the cars pass you, since speed differences are probably the major safety issue in being overtaken. I don't think it's rude at all, since you're not staying in front. 4 is the really rude option, holding up everyone. 5 is nice if you're suicidal ... ;)
Oct
20
comment Why don't cyclists wear all-encompassing motorcycle-style helmets?
@Mauro "which really should be used when riding bicycles too": Indeed they should. (And many do.) But of course looking over your shoulder with a helmet on is far less effective, due to the limited field of vision, than looking over your shoulder without one. I consider a comparison between helmet + safety checks and no helmet + no safety checks to be unfair; the helmet and the checks are independent. Also consider that on a motorcycle, you have mirrors, so direct field of vision is less important.
Oct
11
comment Can I ride home with a broken spoke?
@Precipitous: You should replace it though. It's not like you'll have trouble riding, but since the load distribution becomes worse, a broken spoke can lead to more spokes breaking. You'd be surprised how much more unstable a wheel with three broken spokes is. Anyway, you'll have to replace it eventually, and doing it sooner rather than later will mean less hassle in the end.
Oct
11
comment Why don't road bikes have disc brakes?
Ah, I see. I'm new to this bikes as serious business thing (though I ride one every day) so not familiar with the jargon. I assumed that 'road bike' was just as opposed to 'off-road bike', i.e. anything that's not a mountain bike or BMX or whatever.
Oct
10
comment Why don't road bikes have disc brakes?
"road bikes are supposed to be light" For racing bikes, sure. But if you use a bike for transportation, the weight of your brakes is hardly relevant.