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Aug
4
comment When do I need more than one bike? How many bike is enough? How many bikes is too many?
I'd like to add more granularity to the idea of matching bikes to road conditions. Most, or all, of my riding conditions are roads/paths but I "need" several bikes. Sometimes I want to ride for fun/leisure/speed without needing to lock the bike (my fast-bike). Sometimes I am doing errands that call for locking the bike in several different urban areas in a day (my beater). Still other times I am doing errands that call for carrying some load (my DIY hauler). Other times I am riding somewhere to meet up with others and will get a ride home (my next bike, a folder).
Aug
4
comment Why do my handlebars wobble left and right?
I would agree with @Gary.Ray and others who are on to wheels being out of true or loose headset. 1) If the OP can tell use about the model/condition of the bike we can rule out low-trail twitchiness (which I doubt). 2) I would also loosen the front wheel and make sure it is properly in the fork, then tighten it again. 3) To see if you have a headset problem get off the bike, squeeze the brakes and put some weight on the handlebars. Then move the handlebars forward and back and see if you feel/hear any clicks or clunks. And 4) do you have a loaded basket on the handlebars?
Sep
24
comment For road riding, are mountain bikes safer than road bikes?
@Randy - I can't speak for anyone else, but for me an all-out sprint used to mean being out of the saddle and trying to keep the torso horizontal. And with the occasional grunting-pedal-stomp I would drop my head down. I don't have that problem anymore as I would have a heart attack or a muscle spasm immediately. ;-)
Sep
23
comment Which tires should I buy for an old road bike?
Right -- and I didn't make the statement as an endorsement.
Sep
23
comment For road riding, are mountain bikes safer than road bikes?
+1 For @PeterH. Also not to be unkindly how do you know if it was the bike, the wheel, the tire or the rider? I personally have done a hard sprint or two where I -- very momentarily -- looked down at the ground/pedals and had a "control scare". But you are on the right track now that you know about trail. A bike meant for criterium racing will be "twitchy" in this sense. At the other end of the spectrum, something like a Surly LHT can be ridden with no hands easily.
Sep
9
comment Front derailleur won't spring back to lower gears
I've had this problem a few times an I agree with this for the most part. Except instead of a hose I've used small brushes (think tooth brush with very stiff bristles). I've tried both vinyl and brass bristles - what ever is handy.
Oct
6
comment Purpose of partially filled in rear drop out
That sounds like good reasoning, but are you sure about that? It seems that with automation and materials costs it would make sense for a manufacturer to figure out their alignment problem. The frame in question is not great but not junk either.
Oct
3
comment MIG Welds vs Brazing for simple bike hacks
Thanks Daniel and WTH. Given the problems with MIG I will still experiment with it knowing that I can ruin the frame. @WTHarper (or anyone else) for brazing are the small Mapp Gas + Oxygen canister set-ups workable or do you really need full sized tanks with Acetylene, etc to get something done?
Oct
3
comment MIG Welds vs Brazing for simple bike hacks
Thanks, TIG does sound like the way to go. I asked about MIG because don't have access to welding equipment and the first few places I found that can provide something for me to use all just offer MIG.
Oct
2
comment Adjusting disk brakes after taking off the wheel
@original poster and everyone else - the first time I had this problem I didn't have a ready access to an allen key to make the adjustment. What I did for the short term was to make a very thin washer/shim by cutting a circle out of a clear plastic package (that some other bike part came in). I put it over the axle between the drop-out and bearing on the side that was rubbing. That moves the whole wheel over the width of the shim. But, this is just a short-term fix until you make the proper adjustment.
Oct
2
comment Adjusting disk brakes after taking off the wheel
@David Sopko - when the skewer is locked down, the fork drop-out is pinched between the bearing/cone and the skewer nuts. Backing off a bit would mean that the dropout is not being pinched as tightly. If the skewer is loosened enough to have any effect on the position of the caliper the wheel will almost certainly be too loose to ride.
Oct
2
comment Adjusting disk brakes after taking off the wheel
@Vorac - are you saying you make the adjustment and it is rubbing again next time? Or sometimes it rubs and sometimes it doesn't after wheel removal/replacement? If the former, you might have a rotor that is warping