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Any code of mine that I publish anywhere on stackexchange.com I hereby place in the public domain to the extent governable by law. Explicitly, I place it under the CC0. This also applies to documentation/instructions etc.

Opinions I post are mine and mine only unless clearly stated.

Attribution (especially if I say anything clever) is appreciated where reasonable - but specifically not demanded.


15h
comment How to thank motorists?
@bdsl In the dark I have a headtorch as well as my front light (good on bends and easily dipped when you've already got the main light dipped and need to see where you're going). It's quite nice for being able to nod when it's too dark for a gesture to be seen.
18h
comment Bosch Nyon and W-LAN
@Matteo back on the PC now so here you go: bosch-ebike.de/en/service/contact/contactform.php (you need to disable noscript to see the forms)
18h
comment Bosch Nyon and W-LAN
Googling "nyon bike computer" in English took me to an English but.de website with contact forms for dealers etc. I'm on my phone now but can send the link if you can't find it (maybe the language Google wants to give you). Also the bike manufacturer (bosch say that's not them) may help - but only by passing your enquiry to bosch.
20h
comment Bosch Nyon and W-LAN
That doesn't look like a nice way of doing business. I'd contact them on the form anyway even though it's not meant for end users, you haven't got anything to lose.
21h
comment Would a person standing on the top tube damage a carbon fibre road bike?
On an alloy bike you'd probably be OK standing on the top tube under the saddle, but it would still be better to stand on the saddle itself. Carbon is too fragile for anything out of the ordinary especially given how sensitive it is to cumulative damage.
23h
comment How to thank motorists?
@Kibbee if anyone can use a license plate to track down a passing vehicle that sounds rather intrusive.
23h
comment How to thank motorists?
I don't think you'll get a universal answer - it will depend on the country, hence the comment. At least round here in the UK raising a hand slightly seems to work - a driver might lift a hand on the steering wheel (with or without letting go), a motorcyclist might use their left (closer) hand to thank a driver that tucked in to let them overtake easily, and if an oncoming car gives me a narrow stretch of road 1st when I'm riding (happens most days and I'm only doing 2km/day at the moment) I'll normally just open my right hand from its normal brake-covering position. A polite smile helps.
1d
revised What to consider when looking for a chainguard?
formatting (always forget how to link on my phone)
1d
revised What to consider when looking for a chainguard?
+more info after re-reading Q
1d
answered What to consider when looking for a chainguard?
2d
comment Bike lights with beam cut-off to avoid dazzling drivers?
On balance you're right. It does heavily depend on riding conditions and I definitely wanted a solution that didn't mean fitting 2 lights just for a commute (any decent lights needed to be removed or they would be stolen). The contribution to different parts of the beam isn't equal across the reflector on the one I have (a much smaller reflector than my previous light) so maybe that helps.
2d
comment Bike lights with beam cut-off to avoid dazzling drivers?
I considered using the lens from an old pair of sunglasses warmed enough to make it flexible. With a narrower light i would have done but it just didn't fit. That would allow around 40% brightness above the cutoff. But in practice the intensity didn't fall sharply to 0.
Jan
26
comment Bike lights with beam cut-off to avoid dazzling drivers?
@PaulH, yes I meant many other makes&models, including some quite a bit cheaper than B&M. They're just not, in my experience, bright enough to illuminate a pitch-dark route at anything approaching a decent commuting speed.
Jan
26
comment Bike lights with beam cut-off to avoid dazzling drivers?
@PaulH many of the lights designed for european city bikes are. Commuting using the bike infrastructure round here would need one of those plus something designed for trails - poor quality tarmac and no lights at all, plus near-invisible hazards (dogs, some cyclists).
Jan
26
answered Bike lights with beam cut-off to avoid dazzling drivers?
Jan
22
comment My back brakes don't lock the wheel (skid): feature or a bug?
@ChrisinAK I find rim pads like a few km before they reach their peak - but I've been using some quite cheap dual compound pads recently. I've got some better ones on order so we'll see if they behave the same.
Jan
22
comment Disc brakes better for rainy days?
After riding through obvious crud a light touch of the brakes for a few metres will help a lot. And on downhills commuting in the wet I prefer to keep the brakes skimming the rims ready for real braking - this is highly compatible with taking the hill a bit slower because of a lack of grip between rubber and road.
Jan
21
comment My back brakes don't lock the wheel (skid): feature or a bug?
@PeteH or conversely not worn in if it's brand new.
Jan
20
comment Can you change gear on your front dérailleur during a cyclo cross race?
I'd expect to shift in 1/3 of a pedal rev if it's well adjusted. And I assume my front derailleur is on a par with my rear which is only Altus.
Jan
20
comment Wear and tear and warranty
It's very easy to leave a chain on too long once its worn and wear out the cassette (or at least some sprockets on it). For commuting when you just get on and go, sometimes heavily laden, it's not all that easy to remember to check everything all the time, and before you know it parts are wearing out.