2 Add some information about legality.
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I've seen cyclists use a few different options in this case:. Whether each option is appropriate depends on local laws, intersection layout, and traffic flow.

  1. Claim the right-most lane that goes straight (don't go into the turning lane). This is probably the safest option (at least for fast riders) because it makes the cyclist very predictable for drivers.
  2. Ride in and take the turning lane. This is usually pretty safe at intersections where the turning lane is empty and where there's a wide lane or bike lane on the other side of the intersection. From the perspective of drivers, the cyclist is just sticking to the right-hand side of the road. Note that this is legal in some states but not others.
  3. Ride in between the non-turning lane and the turning lane. This works pretty well when traffic is stopped, and you can stop on or near the lane line. Turning lanes are often wide enough to leave room for cars who are turning to pass. Note that this is legal in some states but not others.
  4. Go on the sidewalk and wait at the crosswalk. Uncomfortable and inexperienced riders seem to prefer this option, but weaving between the road and sidewalks seems very unsafe.

I use all of the first 3 options depending on the amount of traffic and the layout of the road and intersection. For example options 2 and 3 work pretty well when a bike lane opens up through the intersection, though they may not be legal in all jurisdictions. Look at local laws and pay attention to what other cyclists do. It's important to be visible and predictable.

I've seen cyclists use a few different options in this case:

  1. Claim the right-most lane that goes straight (don't go into the turning lane). This is probably the safest option (at least for fast riders) because it makes the cyclist very predictable for drivers.
  2. Ride in and take the turning lane. This is usually pretty safe at intersections where the turning lane is empty and where there's a wide lane or bike lane on the other side of the intersection. From the perspective of drivers, the cyclist is just sticking to the right-hand side of the road.
  3. Ride in between the non-turning lane and the turning lane. This works pretty well when traffic is stopped, and you can stop on or near the lane line. Turning lanes are often wide enough to leave room for cars who are turning to pass.
  4. Go on the sidewalk and wait at the crosswalk. Uncomfortable and inexperienced riders seem to prefer this option, but weaving between the road and sidewalks seems very unsafe.

I use all of the first 3 options depending on the amount of traffic and the layout of the road and intersection. For example options 2 and 3 work pretty well when a bike lane opens up through the intersection.

I've seen cyclists use a few different options in this case. Whether each option is appropriate depends on local laws, intersection layout, and traffic flow.

  1. Claim the right-most lane that goes straight (don't go into the turning lane). This is probably the safest option (at least for fast riders) because it makes the cyclist very predictable for drivers.
  2. Ride in and take the turning lane. This is usually pretty safe at intersections where the turning lane is empty and where there's a wide lane or bike lane on the other side of the intersection. From the perspective of drivers, the cyclist is just sticking to the right-hand side of the road. Note that this is legal in some states but not others.
  3. Ride in between the non-turning lane and the turning lane. This works pretty well when traffic is stopped, and you can stop on or near the lane line. Turning lanes are often wide enough to leave room for cars who are turning to pass. Note that this is legal in some states but not others.
  4. Go on the sidewalk and wait at the crosswalk. Uncomfortable and inexperienced riders seem to prefer this option, but weaving between the road and sidewalks seems very unsafe.

I use all of the first 3 options depending on the amount of traffic and the layout of the road and intersection. For example options 2 and 3 work pretty well when a bike lane opens up through the intersection, though they may not be legal in all jurisdictions. Look at local laws and pay attention to what other cyclists do. It's important to be visible and predictable.

1
source | link

I've seen cyclists use a few different options in this case:

  1. Claim the right-most lane that goes straight (don't go into the turning lane). This is probably the safest option (at least for fast riders) because it makes the cyclist very predictable for drivers.
  2. Ride in and take the turning lane. This is usually pretty safe at intersections where the turning lane is empty and where there's a wide lane or bike lane on the other side of the intersection. From the perspective of drivers, the cyclist is just sticking to the right-hand side of the road.
  3. Ride in between the non-turning lane and the turning lane. This works pretty well when traffic is stopped, and you can stop on or near the lane line. Turning lanes are often wide enough to leave room for cars who are turning to pass.
  4. Go on the sidewalk and wait at the crosswalk. Uncomfortable and inexperienced riders seem to prefer this option, but weaving between the road and sidewalks seems very unsafe.

I use all of the first 3 options depending on the amount of traffic and the layout of the road and intersection. For example options 2 and 3 work pretty well when a bike lane opens up through the intersection.