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Unfortunately there's no magic formula. A lot depends on your age and training base going into the race season.

There are two things you need to balance:

  1. Intervals/speed workout.

  2. Burnout/injuries.

You will see the fastest gain in the shortest time doing intervals, but you also put yourself at the greatest risk for injury/burnout. Given that you're attempting a relatively long peak, you should probably treat most of your races as simply complex speed workouts and focus on a few events.

For the events you focus on you'll need to take a rest break to allow the training benefits you're getting to take full effect. However, you can't do that every week as you'll never see the training benefits. Learning to monitor yourself and whether you really need rest or not is the hardest part of self-coaching.

You might find the book "Time Crunched Cyclist" very useful. You need to establish periodicity in your schedule if you're going to make it to March.

Here's my best guess at a schedule:

Sun- Race Day
Mon- Active Rest ( very easy 30 mins- hr )
Tues- Skills Practice ( Moderate short efforts, should be fun )
Wed- Intervals
Thurs- Intervals
Fri- Active Rest ( or day off ) 
Sat- Skills Practice or fun ride ( fun should feel like lot's left in the tank after ride ) 

That's not a schedule you can maintain long term and it's not a schedule for an older or less trained athelete. After probably 3-4 weeks, you should take a rest week. If you ever start feeling like training is a job, then that's a good signal to take a break. Remember, no training plan survives contact with real life. Recovery is just as important as stress in achieving fitness. Near the end of your season, you should start tapering off on the speed work altogether.

As to whether I know anything or not, well I've been doing endurance sports for over 40 years and I've at least learned all the wrong ways to train.

Unfortunately there's no magic formula. A lot depends on your age and training base going into the race season.

There are two things you need to balance:

  1. Intervals/speed workout.

  2. Burnout/injuries.

You will see the fastest gain in the shortest time doing intervals, but you also put yourself at the greatest risk for injury/burnout. Given that you're attempting a relatively long peak, you should probably treat most of your races as simply complex speed workouts and focus on a few events.

For the events you focus on you'll need to take a rest break to allow the training benefits you're getting to take full effect. However, you can't do that every week as you'll never see the training benefits. Learning to monitor yourself and whether you really need rest or not is the hardest part of self-coaching.

You might find the book "Time Crunched Cyclist" very useful. You need to establish periodicity in your schedule if you're going to make it to March.

Here's my best guess at a schedule:

Sun- Race Day
Mon- Active Rest ( very easy 30 mins- hr )
Tues- Skills Practice ( Moderate short efforts, should be fun )
Wed- Intervals
Thurs- Intervals
Fri- Active Rest ( or day off ) 
Sat- Skills Practice or fun ride ( fun should feel like lot's left in the tank after ride ) 

That's not a schedule you can maintain long term and it's not a schedule for an older or less trained athelete. After probably 3-4 weeks, you should take a rest week. If you ever start feeling like training is a job, then that's a good signal to take a break. Recovery is just as important as stress in achieving fitness. Near the end of your season, you should start tapering off on the speed work altogether.

As to whether I know anything or not, well I've been doing endurance sports for over 40 years and I've at least learned all the wrong ways to train.

Unfortunately there's no magic formula. A lot depends on your age and training base going into the race season.

There are two things you need to balance:

  1. Intervals/speed workout.

  2. Burnout/injuries.

You will see the fastest gain in the shortest time doing intervals, but you also put yourself at the greatest risk for injury/burnout. Given that you're attempting a relatively long peak, you should probably treat most of your races as simply complex speed workouts and focus on a few events.

For the events you focus on you'll need to take a rest break to allow the training benefits you're getting to take full effect. However, you can't do that every week as you'll never see the training benefits. Learning to monitor yourself and whether you really need rest or not is the hardest part of self-coaching.

You might find the book "Time Crunched Cyclist" very useful. You need to establish periodicity in your schedule if you're going to make it to March.

Here's my best guess at a schedule:

Sun- Race Day
Mon- Active Rest ( very easy 30 mins- hr )
Tues- Skills Practice ( Moderate short efforts, should be fun )
Wed- Intervals
Thurs- Intervals
Fri- Active Rest ( or day off ) 
Sat- Skills Practice or fun ride ( fun should feel like lot's left in the tank after ride ) 

That's not a schedule you can maintain long term and it's not a schedule for an older or less trained athelete. After probably 3-4 weeks, you should take a rest week. If you ever start feeling like training is a job, then that's a good signal to take a break. Remember, no training plan survives contact with real life. Recovery is just as important as stress in achieving fitness. Near the end of your season, you should start tapering off on the speed work altogether.

As to whether I know anything or not, well I've been doing endurance sports for over 40 years and I've at least learned all the wrong ways to train.

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Unfortunately there's no magic formula. A lot depends on your age and training base going into the race season.

There are two things you need to balance:

  1. Intervals/speed workout.

  2. Burnout/injuries.

You will see the fastest gain in the shortest time doing intervals, but you also put yourself at the greatest risk for injury/burnout. Given that you're attempting a relatively long peak, you should probably treat most of your races as simply complex speed workouts and focus on a few events.

For the events you focus on you'll need to take a rest break to allow the training benefits you're getting to take full effect. However, you can't do that every week as you'll never see the training benefits. Learning to monitor yourself and whether you really need rest or not is the hardest part of self-coaching.

You might find the book "Time Crunched Cyclist" very useful. You need to establish periodicity in your schedule if you're going to make it to March.

Here's my best guess at a schedule:

Sun- Race Day
Mon- Active Rest ( very easy 30 mins- hr )
Tues- Skills Practice ( Moderate short efforts, should be fun )
Wed- Intervals
Thurs- Intervals
Fri- Active Rest ( or day off ) 
Sat- Skills Practice or fun ride ( fun should feel like lot's left in the tank after ride ) 

That's not a schedule you can maintain long term and it's not a schedule for an older or less trained athelete. After probably 3-4 weeks, you should take a rest week. If you ever start feeling like training is a job, then that's a good signal to take a break. Recovery is just as important as stress in achieving fitness. Near the end of your season, you should start tapering off on the speed work altogether.

As to whether I know anything or not, well I've been doing endurance sports for over 40 years and I've at least learned all the wrong ways to train.