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Most of the advice you're getting here is great, but a few caveats:

  • When hand-signaling, wave your hand a little, or even raise and lower your arm severala couple times. I believe it triggers an instinctive response in people who see that in their peripheral vision ("Ooh! Who's that waving at me? Do I know this person?"), and they notice me far more often.
  • As cars are approaching, and are still well behind you, turn your head to look back. Again, I believe it triggers that same instinctive response.
  • If you live in a region where riding with blinking lights is illegal, encourage every local cycling group to lobby for a change to that law. It's stupid, and only creates a higher risk of collision.
  • Obviously don't ride at night with blinking headlights, but always use a blinking taillight. But in the daytime, if allowed, do it 100% of the time.
  • Get bright lights! Most cheaper lights just don't attract enough attention.
  • When using a bike lane, hug the outside edgeline until vehicles are near you, then fade toward the edgecurb as they're passing (if you won't get doored), just as you would do on roads without bike lanes.
  • Get some hi-vis stickers and apply them to different areas of your bike. Under vehicle headlights, they're as visible as bike lights.
  • When taking the lane, ride in front of the driver's position to increase your odds of being seen.

I've followed these guidelines for the past six years without incident, on an asphalt-grey bike with black fenders, and without wearing any bright clothing (not that brighter clothing is unnecessary - just not my style).

Most of the advice you're getting here is great, but a few caveats:

  • When hand-signaling, wave your hand a little, or even raise and lower your arm several times. I believe it triggers an instinctive response in people who see that in their peripheral vision ("Ooh! Who's that waving at me? Do I know this person?"), and they notice me far more often.
  • As cars are approaching, and are still well behind you, turn your head to look back. Again, I believe it triggers that same instinctive response.
  • If you live in a region where riding with blinking lights is illegal, encourage every local cycling group to lobby for a change to that law. It's stupid, and only creates a higher risk of collision.
  • Obviously don't ride at night with blinking headlights, but always use a blinking taillight. But in the daytime, if allowed, do it 100% of the time.
  • Get bright lights! Most cheaper lights just don't attract enough attention.
  • When using a bike lane, hug the outside edge until vehicles are near you, then fade toward the edge as they're passing, just as you would do on roads without bike lanes.
  • Get some hi-vis stickers and apply them to different areas of your bike. Under vehicle headlights, they're as visible as bike lights.
  • When taking the lane, ride in front of the driver's position to increase your odds of being seen.

I've followed these guidelines for the past six years without incident, on an asphalt-grey bike with black fenders, and without wearing any bright clothing (not that brighter clothing is unnecessary - just not my style).

Most of the advice you're getting here is great, but a few caveats:

  • When hand-signaling, wave your hand a little, or even raise and lower your arm a couple times. I believe it triggers an instinctive response in people who see that in their peripheral vision ("Ooh! Who's that waving at me? Do I know this person?"), and they notice me far more often.
  • As cars are approaching, and are still well behind you, turn your head to look back. Again, I believe it triggers that same instinctive response.
  • If you live in a region where riding with blinking lights is illegal, encourage every local cycling group to lobby for a change to that law. It's stupid, and only creates a higher risk of collision.
  • Obviously don't ride at night with blinking headlights, but always use a blinking taillight. But in the daytime, if allowed, do it 100% of the time.
  • Get bright lights! Most cheaper lights just don't attract enough attention.
  • When using a bike lane, hug the line until vehicles are near you, then fade toward the curb as they're passing (if you won't get doored), just as you would do on roads without bike lanes.
  • Get some hi-vis stickers and apply them to different areas of your bike. Under vehicle headlights, they're as visible as bike lights.
  • When taking the lane, ride in front of the driver's position to increase your odds of being seen.

I've followed these guidelines for the past six years without incident, on an asphalt-grey bike with black fenders, and without wearing any bright clothing (not that brighter clothing is unnecessary - just not my style).

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Most of the advice you're getting here is great, but a few caveats:

  • When hand-signaling, wave your hand a little, or even raise and lower your arm several times. I believe it triggers an instinctive response in people who see that in their peripheral vision ("Ooh! Who's that waving at me? Do I know this person?"), and they notice me far more often.
  • As cars are approaching, and are still well behind you, turn your head to look back. Again, I believe it triggers that same instinctive response.
  • If you live in a region where riding with blinking lights is illegal, encourage every local cycling group to lobby for a change to that law. It's stupid, and only creates a higher risk of collision.
  • Obviously don't ride at night with blinking headlights, but always use a blinking taillight. But in the daytime, if allowed, do it 100% of the time.
  • Get bright lights! Most cheaper lights just don't attract enough attention.
  • When using a bike lane, hug the outside edge until vehicles are near you, then fade toward the edge as they're passing, just as you would do on roads without bike lanes.
  • Get some hi-vis stickers and apply them to different areas of your bike. Under vehicle headlights, they're as visible as bike lights.
  • When taking the lane, ride in front of the driver's position to increase your odds of being seen.

I've followed these guidelines for the past six years without incident, on an asphalt-grey bike with black fenders, and without wearing any bright clothing (not that brighter clothing is unnecessary - just not my style).