3 Cleaning up my peddling messes
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Answer: Learn to bike more defensively at all times, and build your confidence by coping with situations as they arise.

Practice at slower speeds on gentler grades, where there is less traffic, fewer obstructions, and ideally a smooth unblemished surface. Sounds like cycling nirvana, but they do exist.

If you're doing near the speed limit (or above) then you are perfectly entitled to take the lane. Get out away from parked cars and driveways and don't put yourself in a position where you need to change something quickly to avoid a problem. Make your path so they can't become problems.

Use your eyes to scan further ahead - right to the limit of your vision and line of sight. Use your peripheral vision to be aware of the closest 30-40 metres of pavement, but don't look directly at it.

Lose the earbuds - use your ears to be aware of whatever is behind you.

Speed wobbles - if you get that fast, use the rear brake only to bleed off some speed slowly to regain stability. Sittingn back down on the bike can help too - these are resonant frequencies of your bike and you, so a minor change in posture can stop the reinforcement.

Unweight your seat - put more weight on your hands and brace the arms in an almost-locked angle. Don't try and tuck for aerodynamics at this point in your recovery. Put your pedals at 3 and 9 and stop peddlingpedalling, to give a platform to stand on.

Finally remember that downhill is not everyone's preference, I don't particularly like it, but its the payback after a long hard climb. Down should take around 1/3 of the time it took to ride up, so 30 minutes to climb is 10 minutes to descend.

Also, consider testing out disk brakes if you are up for new kit. Road disk rotors can be super lightweight, which decreases their effectiveness in the heat. Personally I'd use thicker MTB disks, and avoid dragging the brakes on a downhill.

Do please let us know what you do and how it works/helps. I'm sure other users will benefit from your learnings, should they experience the same problems.

Edit -- Legitimately, its okay to be apprehensive about downhill. In reality its one of the most dangerous things we can do on a bike, exceeded only by downhill MTB racing with jumps. Don't feel that you have to go downhill at ludicrous speeds.

Answer: Learn to bike more defensively at all times, and build your confidence by coping with situations as they arise.

Practice at slower speeds on gentler grades, where there is less traffic, fewer obstructions, and ideally a smooth unblemished surface. Sounds like cycling nirvana, but they do exist.

If you're doing near the speed limit (or above) then you are perfectly entitled to take the lane. Get out away from parked cars and driveways and don't put yourself in a position where you need to change something quickly to avoid a problem. Make your path so they can't become problems.

Use your eyes to scan further ahead - right to the limit of your vision and line of sight. Use your peripheral vision to be aware of the closest 30-40 metres of pavement, but don't look directly at it.

Lose the earbuds - use your ears to be aware of whatever is behind you.

Speed wobbles - if you get that fast, use the rear brake only to bleed off some speed slowly to regain stability. Sittingn back down on the bike can help too - these are resonant frequencies of your bike and you, so a minor change in posture can stop the reinforcement.

Unweight your seat - put more weight on your hands and brace the arms in an almost-locked angle. Don't try and tuck for aerodynamics at this point in your recovery. Put your pedals at 3 and 9 and stop peddling, to give a platform to stand on.

Finally remember that downhill is not everyone's preference, I don't particularly like it, but its the payback after a long hard climb. Down should take around 1/3 of the time it took to ride up, so 30 minutes to climb is 10 minutes to descend.

Also, consider testing out disk brakes if you are up for new kit. Road disk rotors can be super lightweight, which decreases their effectiveness in the heat. Personally I'd use thicker MTB disks, and avoid dragging the brakes on a downhill.

Do please let us know what you do and how it works/helps. I'm sure other users will benefit from your learnings, should they experience the same problems.

Edit -- Legitimately, its okay to be apprehensive about downhill. In reality its one of the most dangerous things we can do on a bike, exceeded only by downhill MTB racing with jumps. Don't feel that you have to go downhill at ludicrous speeds.

Answer: Learn to bike more defensively at all times, and build your confidence by coping with situations as they arise.

Practice at slower speeds on gentler grades, where there is less traffic, fewer obstructions, and ideally a smooth unblemished surface. Sounds like cycling nirvana, but they do exist.

If you're doing near the speed limit (or above) then you are perfectly entitled to take the lane. Get out away from parked cars and driveways and don't put yourself in a position where you need to change something quickly to avoid a problem. Make your path so they can't become problems.

Use your eyes to scan further ahead - right to the limit of your vision and line of sight. Use your peripheral vision to be aware of the closest 30-40 metres of pavement, but don't look directly at it.

Lose the earbuds - use your ears to be aware of whatever is behind you.

Speed wobbles - if you get that fast, use the rear brake only to bleed off some speed slowly to regain stability. Sittingn back down on the bike can help too - these are resonant frequencies of your bike and you, so a minor change in posture can stop the reinforcement.

Unweight your seat - put more weight on your hands and brace the arms in an almost-locked angle. Don't try and tuck for aerodynamics at this point in your recovery. Put your pedals at 3 and 9 and stop pedalling, to give a platform to stand on.

Finally remember that downhill is not everyone's preference, I don't particularly like it, but its the payback after a long hard climb. Down should take around 1/3 of the time it took to ride up, so 30 minutes to climb is 10 minutes to descend.

Also, consider testing out disk brakes if you are up for new kit. Road disk rotors can be super lightweight, which decreases their effectiveness in the heat. Personally I'd use thicker MTB disks, and avoid dragging the brakes on a downhill.

Do please let us know what you do and how it works/helps. I'm sure other users will benefit from your learnings, should they experience the same problems.

Edit -- Legitimately, its okay to be apprehensive about downhill. In reality its one of the most dangerous things we can do on a bike, exceeded only by downhill MTB racing with jumps. Don't feel that you have to go downhill at ludicrous speeds.

2 Added summary
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Answer: Learn to bike more defensively at all times, and build your confidence by coping with situations as they arise.

Practice at slower speeds on gentler grades, where there is less traffic, fewer obstructions, and ideally a smooth unblemished surface. Sounds like cycling nirvana, but they do exist.

If you're doing near the speed limit (or above) then you are perfectly entitled to take the lane. Get out away from parked cars and driveways and don't put yourself in a position where you need to change something quickly to avoid a problem. Make your path so they can't become problems.

Use your eyes to scan further ahead - right to the limit of your vision and line of sight. Use your peripheral vision to be aware of the closest 30-40 metres of pavement, but don't look directly at it.

Lose the earbuds - use your ears to be aware of whatever is behind you.

Speed wobbles - if you get that fast, use the rear brake only to bleed off some speed slowly to regain stability. Sittingn back down on the bike can help too - these are resonant frequencies of your bike and you, so a minor change in posture can stop the reinforcement.

Unweight your seat - put more weight on your hands and brace the arms in an almost-locked angle. Don't try and tuck for aerodynamics at this point in your recovery. Put your pedals at 3 and 9 and stop peddling, to give a platform to stand on.

Finally remember that downhill is not everyone's preference, I don't particularly like it, but its the payback after a long hard climb. Down should take around 1/3 of the time it took to ride up, so 30 minutes to climb is 10 minutes to descend.

Also, consider testing out disk brakes if you are up for new kit. Road disk rotors can be super lightweight, which decreases their effectiveness in the heat. Personally I'd use thicker MTB disks, and avoid dragging the brakes on a downhill.

Do please let us know what you do and how it works/helps. I'm sure other users will benefit from your learnings, should they experience the same problems.

Edit -- Legitimately, its okay to be apprehensive about downhill. In reality its one of the most dangerous things we can do on a bike, exceeded only by downhill MTB racing with jumps. Don't feel that you have to go downhill at ludicrous speeds.

Answer: Learn to bike more defensively at all times, and build your confidence by coping with situations as they arise.

Practice at slower speeds on gentler grades, where there is less traffic, fewer obstructions, and ideally a smooth unblemished surface. Sounds like cycling nirvana, but they do exist.

If you're doing near the speed limit (or above) then you are perfectly entitled to take the lane. Get out away from parked cars and driveways and don't put yourself in a position where you need to change something quickly to avoid a problem. Make your path so they can't become problems.

Use your eyes to scan further ahead - right to the limit of your vision and line of sight. Use your peripheral vision to be aware of the closest 30-40 metres of pavement, but don't look directly at it.

Lose the earbuds - use your ears to be aware of whatever is behind you.

Speed wobbles - if you get that fast, use the rear brake only to bleed off some speed slowly to regain stability. Sittingn back down on the bike can help too - these are resonant frequencies of your bike and you, so a minor change in posture can stop the reinforcement.

Unweight your seat - put more weight on your hands and brace the arms in an almost-locked angle. Don't try and tuck for aerodynamics at this point in your recovery. Put your pedals at 3 and 9 and stop peddling, to give a platform to stand on.

Finally remember that downhill is not everyone's preference, I don't particularly like it, but its the payback after a long hard climb. Down should take around 1/3 of the time it took to ride up, so 30 minutes to climb is 10 minutes to descend.

Also, consider testing out disk brakes if you are up for new kit. Road disk rotors can be super lightweight, which decreases their effectiveness in the heat. Personally I'd use thicker MTB disks, and avoid dragging the brakes on a downhill.

Do please let us know what you do and how it works/helps. I'm sure other users will benefit from your learnings, should they experience the same problems.

Answer: Learn to bike more defensively at all times, and build your confidence by coping with situations as they arise.

Practice at slower speeds on gentler grades, where there is less traffic, fewer obstructions, and ideally a smooth unblemished surface. Sounds like cycling nirvana, but they do exist.

If you're doing near the speed limit (or above) then you are perfectly entitled to take the lane. Get out away from parked cars and driveways and don't put yourself in a position where you need to change something quickly to avoid a problem. Make your path so they can't become problems.

Use your eyes to scan further ahead - right to the limit of your vision and line of sight. Use your peripheral vision to be aware of the closest 30-40 metres of pavement, but don't look directly at it.

Lose the earbuds - use your ears to be aware of whatever is behind you.

Speed wobbles - if you get that fast, use the rear brake only to bleed off some speed slowly to regain stability. Sittingn back down on the bike can help too - these are resonant frequencies of your bike and you, so a minor change in posture can stop the reinforcement.

Unweight your seat - put more weight on your hands and brace the arms in an almost-locked angle. Don't try and tuck for aerodynamics at this point in your recovery. Put your pedals at 3 and 9 and stop peddling, to give a platform to stand on.

Finally remember that downhill is not everyone's preference, I don't particularly like it, but its the payback after a long hard climb. Down should take around 1/3 of the time it took to ride up, so 30 minutes to climb is 10 minutes to descend.

Also, consider testing out disk brakes if you are up for new kit. Road disk rotors can be super lightweight, which decreases their effectiveness in the heat. Personally I'd use thicker MTB disks, and avoid dragging the brakes on a downhill.

Do please let us know what you do and how it works/helps. I'm sure other users will benefit from your learnings, should they experience the same problems.

Edit -- Legitimately, its okay to be apprehensive about downhill. In reality its one of the most dangerous things we can do on a bike, exceeded only by downhill MTB racing with jumps. Don't feel that you have to go downhill at ludicrous speeds.

1
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Answer: Learn to bike more defensively at all times, and build your confidence by coping with situations as they arise.

Practice at slower speeds on gentler grades, where there is less traffic, fewer obstructions, and ideally a smooth unblemished surface. Sounds like cycling nirvana, but they do exist.

If you're doing near the speed limit (or above) then you are perfectly entitled to take the lane. Get out away from parked cars and driveways and don't put yourself in a position where you need to change something quickly to avoid a problem. Make your path so they can't become problems.

Use your eyes to scan further ahead - right to the limit of your vision and line of sight. Use your peripheral vision to be aware of the closest 30-40 metres of pavement, but don't look directly at it.

Lose the earbuds - use your ears to be aware of whatever is behind you.

Speed wobbles - if you get that fast, use the rear brake only to bleed off some speed slowly to regain stability. Sittingn back down on the bike can help too - these are resonant frequencies of your bike and you, so a minor change in posture can stop the reinforcement.

Unweight your seat - put more weight on your hands and brace the arms in an almost-locked angle. Don't try and tuck for aerodynamics at this point in your recovery. Put your pedals at 3 and 9 and stop peddling, to give a platform to stand on.

Finally remember that downhill is not everyone's preference, I don't particularly like it, but its the payback after a long hard climb. Down should take around 1/3 of the time it took to ride up, so 30 minutes to climb is 10 minutes to descend.

Also, consider testing out disk brakes if you are up for new kit. Road disk rotors can be super lightweight, which decreases their effectiveness in the heat. Personally I'd use thicker MTB disks, and avoid dragging the brakes on a downhill.

Do please let us know what you do and how it works/helps. I'm sure other users will benefit from your learnings, should they experience the same problems.