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If you’re replacing a 126mm with a 126mm then it sounds like whoever built the wheel didn’t know what your hub offset was.

You further clarified that you replaced a 6-speed freewheel with seven speed, which would of course change the chain line on the smallest cog. This isn’t the wheelbuilders fault. You can follow the advice here or go back to 6 speeds.

You can change it by switching spacers from one side to the other but then your wheel dish might be a few mm off. It won’t matter for most things and most brakes should be able to adjust slightly to compensate. But your wheel tracking will be slightly off and brakes slightly off. You might not ever notice it.

Ideally, you’d have the builder or the bike shop re-dish. If it’s just a few mm they should be able to do it with the existing spokes unless they didn’t give themselves enough breathing space when they originally built it.

If you’re replacing a 126mm with a 126mm then it sounds like whoever built the wheel didn’t know what your hub offset was.

You can change it by switching spacers from one side to the other but then your wheel dish might be a few mm off. It won’t matter for most things and most brakes should be able to adjust slightly to compensate. But your wheel tracking will be slightly off and brakes slightly off. You might not ever notice it.

Ideally, you’d have the builder or the bike shop re-dish. If it’s just a few mm they should be able to do it with the existing spokes unless they didn’t give themselves enough breathing space when they originally built it.

If you’re replacing a 126mm with a 126mm then it sounds like whoever built the wheel didn’t know what your hub offset was.

You further clarified that you replaced a 6-speed freewheel with seven speed, which would of course change the chain line on the smallest cog. This isn’t the wheelbuilders fault. You can follow the advice here or go back to 6 speeds.

You can change it by switching spacers from one side to the other but then your wheel dish might be a few mm off. It won’t matter for most things and most brakes should be able to adjust slightly to compensate. But your wheel tracking will be slightly off and brakes slightly off. You might not ever notice it.

Ideally, you’d have the builder or the bike shop re-dish. If it’s just a few mm they should be able to do it with the existing spokes unless they didn’t give themselves enough breathing space when they originally built it.

2 added 225 characters in body; edited body
source | link

If you’re replacing a 126mm with a 126mm then it sounds like whoever built the wheel didn’t know what your hub offset was.

You can change it by switching spacers from one side to the other but then your wheel dish might be a few mm off. It won’t matter for most things and most brakes should be able to adjust slightly to compensate. But your wheel tracking will be slightly off and brakes slightly off. You might not ever notice it.

Ideally, you’d have the builder or the bike shop re-dish. If it’s just a few mm they should be able to do it with the existing spokes unless they didn’t give themselves enough breathing space when they originally built it.

If you’re replacing a 126mm with a 126mm then it sounds like whoever built the wheel didn’t know what your hub offset was.

You can change it by switching spacers from one side to the other but then your wheel dish might be a few mm off. It won’t matter for most things and most brakes should be able to adjust slightly to compensate. But your wheel tracking will be slightly off and brakes slightly off. You might not ever notice it.

If you’re replacing a 126mm with a 126mm then it sounds like whoever built the wheel didn’t know what your hub offset was.

You can change it by switching spacers from one side to the other but then your wheel dish might be a few mm off. It won’t matter for most things and most brakes should be able to adjust slightly to compensate. But your wheel tracking will be slightly off and brakes slightly off. You might not ever notice it.

Ideally, you’d have the builder or the bike shop re-dish. If it’s just a few mm they should be able to do it with the existing spokes unless they didn’t give themselves enough breathing space when they originally built it.

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source | link

If you’re replacing a 126mm with a 126mm then it sounds like whoever built the wheel didn’t know what your hub offset was.

You can change it by switching spacers from one side to the other but then your wheel dish might be a few mm off. It won’t matter for most things and most brakes should be able to adjust slightly to compensate. But your wheel tracking will be slightly off and brakes slightly off. You might not ever notice it.