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This question already has an answer here:

I own a Trek 3500 and am an avid biker... I bike on roads mostly, but sometimes on trails too.. Is there any information anyone could share that would assist me in adjusting air pressure in the Tire? or is it through and through fully filled up tires?

I feel that there might be a necessary modulation to better the ride experience on flat and smooth (road) and difficult (trails) tracks...

marked as duplicate by Batman, Gary.Ray Oct 3 '14 at 13:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • See my answer to this question as well. You just need to play with it. – Batman Oct 3 '14 at 5:03
  • If you're only on the road, and you want speed and efficiency, you should be running at least 60 pounds, perhaps 80. (Run near the sidewall upper limit.) You soften the tire from there based on how much off-road riding you want to do. – Daniel R Hicks Oct 3 '14 at 11:37
  • (And, of course, for road efficiency you want tires that are nearly treadless.) – Daniel R Hicks Oct 3 '14 at 11:39
  • [Citation needed] for the "nearly". – Emyr Oct 3 '14 at 16:22
  • This is a dupe, but the article linked to about pressure for road bike tires is not the right one. The Trek 3500 is a mountain bike, so the road bike article is not of much help. This is a better match for a dupe: What pressure should I run my Mountain Bike tires at? – Johnny Oct 6 '14 at 22:46
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I assume that:

  • you run stock Trek 3500 so you have 2 inch tyres
  • you are not 200lbs (judging by your photo, location and fever for fitness in your profile)

Start with 40 PSI on the rear and 35 PSI on the front and ride at that pressure for a couple of rides to understand how it feels. Then adjust +-3 PSI to see how the handling changes. If you ever get a pinch flat increase 1 PSI on front and 4 on the rear.

For trails, aim for a 10-20% height reduction on the tyre height on where it touches the ground when you are standing on the bike.

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