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My touring bike (which I use for commuting) needs repairs which will cost £200... half the price of a new one.

I am not mechanically-minded.... and I am too busy and too old to learn!

A new bike will cost twice the price. But with the new bike, I get all the things the repairs will bring.... plus new wheels, new tires, a shiny frame (the current one is scarred but not damaged).

The bike shop say repairing is the best option.

I'm thinking.... keep the bike over the summer.... and buy another when the end-of-season sale comes along.

The repairs are: a major service, replacement of all the drive mechanism, etc.

Advice please!

  • Can you let us know what you are currently riding and it's potential replacement. Then we can give some cost benefit analysis. – mikes May 1 '15 at 9:14
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    A decent touring bike, at 6 years old, is practically brand new, unless you've really abused it. – Daniel R Hicks May 1 '15 at 11:55
  • If you have a steel frame in good shape and you like the way the bike rides then I would repair. – paparazzo May 1 '15 at 11:56
  • Is it really a touring bike? I'm surprised you can get a touring bike in the UK for 400 Pounds. It would also help if you said specifically what needs to be done. – Batman May 1 '15 at 14:48
  • The bike in question is a Revolution Country Traveller, costing originally under £400. The company that sells them has an end-of-season sale in the very late autumn with generous discounts. A new one currently costs £500. However, Revolution do a cyclocross bike at £400... to which I could add the racks from the Traveller. – Dick Moore May 1 '15 at 18:17
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As LBS mechanic, I also would recommend to repair - the cost is sufficient. Your bike will be almost as new.
So if it's a bike that worth repair (like mikes mentioned), and your tires and derailleurs are in good condition yet, go for it.
If you know that you should replace tires or derailleurs soon, better is to buy a new one with all parts new and a warranty.

Edit: if you will anyway buy a new bike soon, you should consider whether you want to do all this repair, or a part of it will be enough.

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