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I want to buy a road bike but I have never had one. I have a limited budget and want to try triathlons. The good brands old bikes are really expensive. Even for a 25 years old bike I have to spend at least 450 Euros.

Surfing in the net, I found this bike on Amazon, which is in my price range.

The problem is that when I have asked "experts" they told me that you cannot buy a decent bike for that price, and this isnt a good bike. Can anyone give an advice? Can this bike be good or is the price determinant for a good quality bike?

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    I think it all depends on parts and probably the parts represent the price. Just dig into parts and you will find out why its cheap. Jul 27 '15 at 10:03
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    Beyond a certain point you're paying for grams of weight reduction. And the lighter, more-expensive bikes are less durable. But I would guess that the breakpoint (where you begin paying for weight reduction, not quality) is around 1000 euros, maybe a hair more. Jul 27 '15 at 11:32
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    Agree with above, you get what you pay for. I have never seen that brand of bike. It doesn't give basic details such as how many gears on the rear wheel, 9, 10 or 11.
    – Kim Ryan
    Jul 27 '15 at 11:44
  • @KimRyan The title says (in German) 14-speed, which does only allow for the conclusion that it's a 2x7 drivetrain. Jul 27 '15 at 15:20
  • Shifters are on the bars by the stem, 7 speed - early 1990's technology.
    – mattnz
    Jul 28 '15 at 0:19
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Search some more for secondhand bikes. EUR 300,- should get you a nice enough used bike from a couple of years back.

A tip I was given when searching for my first bike was to search the bike or racing bike category on ebay and similar sites for "ultegra" or the name of some other sufficiently high-end groupset rather than the brand. This filters out a lot of bad bikes, and a high quality groupset is very desirable in a secondhand bike because it is expensive to replace yet wears out very quickly (unlike (most) frames that are also expensive to replace but don't wear out so much). This search on the dutch e-bay equivalent gets you a few good options in your price range.

As to your question, I agree with Daniel R Hicks' comment that beyond about 1000-1200 euro's you are mostly paying for weight reduction (which might even impact durability) rather than 'just' for quality. I also agree with your "experts", you cannot buy even a descent new bike for that price, secondhand is a whole different story however.

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    Yeah, I should have mentioned the option of buying used. Or sometimes a friend or relative has a bike sitting in their garage that they'll let you have for free, or very cheap. Jul 27 '15 at 13:15
  • Shopping for used bicycles can be hard, especially if you have little experience. It can be hard to gauge fit, even with a test ride. Names like “Ultegra” can be used for traps eg. only making the rear derallieur Ultegra and the rest some cheap Tiagra. The wheels are often the cheapest kind, though not necessarily bad (especially if one checks the spoke tension). To some extent those points hold true for new bicycles too, but at least you have a shop and mechanic who’s responsible and has a reputation to loose.
    – Michael
    Jul 27 '15 at 14:36
  • @Michael - although-true, its unlikely someone will fit Ultegra to a BSO :) Best bet for a novice is LBS's - some have second hand bikes and although a bit more expensive, are well worth it for a novice. if going private, limit the bike search to a couple of well known brand and model bikes, up to 5 years old. use the internet to compare pictures and make sure its the same bike (colour.decals etc).
    – mattnz
    Jul 28 '15 at 0:24
  • @Michael most bikes with full high(er)end groupsets can easily be googled and verified for authenticity, even for a novice this should provide no huge challenge. As for the fit: I "bought" a bike fitting at my LBS for a small fee, and with those numbers I checked all secondhand bikes I was interested in. You can do this yourself with a tape measure, or again, find the bike specs on google and determine which frame size(s) can be adapted to fit you. Aug 2 '15 at 12:26

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