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I have an older road bike and I am looking to renovate it. The rims on my wheels are pretty thin, and I very much like the look of deeper rim wheels. Can I produce this effect without buying new wheels completely, seeing as they are kind of expensive?

Also, I was thinking about painting my rims black as well. Would I just put two coats of black on it (right now they are original metal), or two coats of primer and then two black?

Same question on the actual frame of the bike, but first I have to take off the current color there, and am interested how to go about painting it.

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  • Frames of your wheels? You mean rims? I know of disc covers for the back wheel but I’ve never heard of an “addon” to turn a low profile rim into a high profile one. Adding width is impossible but depending on your current setup wider tires might be possible. For new paint you first have to remove the old paint. It’s best to let a professional (eg. car paint shop) do it. With rim brakes you’d have to cover the braking surfaces or clean them afterwards. – Michael Aug 17 '15 at 17:30
  • This should really be two or three questions. There are already a number of frame painting answers on the site, so that part should be removed. I've voted to close pending your edit down to a single question. – Móż Aug 17 '15 at 21:50
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I'm only going to answer your first question here:

The rims on my wheels are pretty thin, and I very much like the look of deeper rim wheels

You can't easily fake deeper rimes to get the carbon fibre aero look. What you could do is use plastic film or disc to fake a complete carbon disc wheel. This would have all the disadvantages of a disc wheel (fragile, vulnerable to cross winds) but also much of the aero advantages of one. It will still be a cheap, heavy wheel, but it will have less air resistance. Many people have done this in the past. Youtube tutorial plus a webpage and another

Note that many of those DIY efforts cover the braking surface of the rim, so you no longer have a brake on the covered wheel. That might not be legal where you live.

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    I live in a very under developed country, no one cares what you do here! – Bozo Vulicevic Aug 17 '15 at 21:59
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    I upvoted, ill check the details of the links tthat you sent me and based on how well its recieved i will decide whether to accept your answer over other ones. – Bozo Vulicevic Aug 17 '15 at 22:23
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I have an older road bike and I am looking to renovate it. The frames on my wheels are pretty thin, and I very much like the look of thicker frame wheels, can I produce this effects without buying new wheels completely, seeing as they are kind of expensive?

Short answer: No. There is no product out there to make a rim look wider. Just wider rims. Which may or may not fit your bike.

However, if you tell us what size tires you have, provide the make & model of the bike & maybe some pictures of the frame where the tires run closest, we may be able to advise you as to whether or not you can fit wider tires. Also, I am assuming that when you say “frames on my wheels” you mean the rim.

Don’t paint the wheels. First of all if you have rim brakes (most likely) the paint will damage the bikes ability to slow effectively while braking & would eventually be rubbed off by the brakes anyway. Also, after a few miles with maybe a little gravel or road debris, the paint will chip & look trashy.

As for painting the frame, if you can afford to, you should really consider having it professionally powder coated. Even a well done spray can job will scratch easily & not last anywhere near as long as a powder coat job.

If you insist on painting it yourself, either sand blast the original finish off & then clean with an evaporating residue free solvent, or at the very least remove any and all decals or stickers, clean with solvent, roughly sand the entire surface, clean with solvent again & then paint.

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    By the way, I forgot to add that whether you paint the frame yourself or take it in to a shop to have it powder coated you need to remove all of the other bits & pieces. Cranks, bottom bracket, fork, headset (including bear surfaces) etc. All of it. If you do it yourself, stuff all openings with newspaper & tape over them with painters tape. Also plug / cover any braze on mounting points for water bottle cages etc & any holes for mounting racks. – renesis Aug 17 '15 at 17:38

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