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Note: this question is about a QR chain tug, not a chain tug for a QR skewer. Just so we're clear.

My Google-fu must be weak after too much indulgence over the holidays, or maybe it just plain don't exist. I'm looking for a chain tug for horizontal rear fork ends to replace the threaded tug bolt that is currently built into the frame.

Why?
A. I like having the bolt/tug to help precisely tune the chain tension, rather than the "wheel walking" technique we all know about.
B. I'm considering running two sets of rubber this winter and anticipate doing a lot of swap-outs before my daily commute.
C. It adds precious seconds (lol) to my tire change routine and I can't find anything else I want to tweak on my current whip, so I'm micro-tuning now to feed the addiction.

Motivation (from one of my comments):

The objective of this theoretical QR chain tug would be to allow you to "set" the proper tension using the wingnut, but then be able to completely release the entire mechanism to be able to derail the chain and then remove the wheel. When you reassemble everything, just tighten the QR lever and you should be back to the correct tension, so then you tighten your axle bolts and you're off to the races...

Anyone know of / invented / hacked such a device?

Feel free to slag me and say, "just shut up and ride".

  • About a QR chain tug, not a chain tug for a QR skewer? I am not clear. – paparazzo Jan 4 '16 at 19:07
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    I would use one tug per wheel. That also saves the tine used to remove the nut and replace it on each wheel when moving the tug. – Móż Jan 4 '16 at 20:51
  • I'm not sure how a quick release would work , or what it would look like. The closest I can think of are the frames with movable dropouts to allow IGHs to work. You might be able to fit a short QR bolt to one of those, but you'd still have to adjust both sides every time (normally both sides have the swinging/sliding dropout). – Móż Jan 5 '16 at 1:33
  • By definition, track ends are rear facing. I'm not sure how such a device would work either, but I'm curious. – Batman Jan 5 '16 at 3:27
  • @Batman Point taken on the track ends. I wrote "rear facing fork ends" and someone edited that. – Tom Auger Jan 5 '16 at 15:06
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I can see your idea, though I'm not sure a quick release style chaintug would work. Although I think I can see how it could be made possible. Hopefully I've explained it well enough!

With a standard 'nutted' chaintug (A), distance 'x' is infinitely adjustable as the the brace ('1') moves fore/aft along the threaded rod ('2'), distance 'y'.

With a 'QR' chaintug (B), distance 'x' when tensioned is fixed. The only slight movement here would be when the QR lever is in the open position. For it to work, I guess '2' would have to be threaded through the centre of the QR lever '3'. In doing so, the lever itself would need a cut-out for the threaded rod to pass through when you open up the lever. Does this make sense?!

So I guess in theory this, or something similar, should be feasible. Whether or not it would be worth the effort I don't know! I use the same tyres (Panaracer RiBMo's) all year on my fixie without chaintugs so I don't have to worry about changing wheels/tyres etc!

Anyway, what's your thoughts guys!?

EDIT

If you just want to be sure you've accurately aligned your rear wheel in the drop out, then an increment etching along the dropouts would be easier.

Google Magnus S reynolds 953 to find the image

Turns out someone else already done this..bugger!

  • I think this is more of a "technically what was asked" than a real answer, since it relies on the two different wheel/cogs being different by exactly the travel of the QR lever (otherwise it's just a wingnut). But since I'm also not sure what the OP actually wants, it might be exactly what they're after. The tail of the bolt is a real problem here, but you might be able to find an offset-lever design that would bypass it. – Móż Jan 5 '16 at 21:10
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    This is so cool, thanks for the extra effort! Let's see... the objective of this theoretical QR chain tug would be to allow you to "set" the proper tension using the wingnut, but then be able to completely release the entire mechanism to be able to derail the chain and then remove the wheel. When you reassemble everything, just tighten the QR level and you should be back to the correct tension, so then tighten the axle bolts and you're off. Is that how you envision your invention? If so, patent that sucker man before Surly gets a hold of it lol. – Tom Auger Jan 5 '16 at 22:15
  • Ha, so it is what you wanted. Brilliant! – Móż Jan 5 '16 at 22:17
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    @Mσᶎ I think a QR with a 'hollow' lever paddle would allow the threaded rod to pass through when it is being un/tightened. Tom Auger, I'm not sure how this would work, to 'lock' the wheel in place, you would of course have to spin the QR lever along the axle before pulling the lever down. So if you wanted to take it off, you'd have to pull the lever then unscrew it a little. I guess the only benefit of the QR lever would be to remove the need for a 10mm spanner that would otherwise be used to tighten the nut on the chaintug... – Bikebum Jan 6 '16 at 20:04
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    @TomAuger I've only used chain tugs to hold tension, because I run IGH with QR so I can't get the bolt holding power you get from a 10mm axle with 15mm nut on it. So the tug very much acts to hold the wheel in place, with the QR almost there just to keep the chain tug on the bike. The cheap aluminium tug I had for a while deformed around the axle hole. – Móż Jan 6 '16 at 20:56

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