0

This question already has an answer here:

My wheels are slightly out of true, about 1.5 mm at worst part. It doesn't bother me when riding and I don't feel it, but will this hurt or damage the wheel if I keep going on, or should I keep going until it starts bothering me?

marked as duplicate by paparazzo, Criggie, Móż, Gary.Ray Mar 5 '16 at 3:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • It doesn't do the wheels any good, but the harm is not great, aside from the issue of what it does to rim brakes. You are increasing the stresses on the wheel, particularly the spokes, and accelerating further wear and failure at perhaps a 2x rate. – Daniel R Hicks Mar 1 '16 at 13:31
  • 1
    Truing a wheel is relatively easy, and only requires one cheap tool, the spoke key. Other tools make it easier, but you can fudge it. Reducing the wobble is easy, eliminating it completely is a knack. – Criggie Mar 1 '16 at 19:16
5

It won't present any immediate danger, however it became untrue for a reason. If the spoke tension has changed more than likely it will get worse over time and riding it while out of true will most certainly expedite that process. Other spokes will lose their tension and could possibly break resulting in a higher repair bill, or possible injury.

You will not immediately damage the wheel or rim but continuing to ride on it will only make it worse. It will also put stress on other aspects of the bike as well and your braking - if rim brake, will likely be slighty less effective.

All of these would be after a while though, so while there is no immediate danger it will get worse the more you ride. Hitting a curb with poorly tensioned spokes could cause one to "pop"

  • In addition, leaning to turn can be a lot sketchier. The wobble can cause the tyre to loose grip easier than a properly trued tyre would. – Criggie Apr 17 '18 at 22:37

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.