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I bought a pair of bicycle pedals that to my surprise had no notches on the pedal spindle to use when tightening them. I managed to screw them in by hand, but they are not quite tight since I can't use a spanner on them. So what would be the correct way to tighten them? Are there any special tools or similar that I'm supposed to use?

The offending pedals can be seen below. The spindle is, as you can see, completely smooth.

enter image description here

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    Look at the threaded ends. There's a hex-shaped hole there, designed for an Allen wrench. – Daniel R Hicks Apr 22 '16 at 4:29
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You have to use an allen/hex wrench, that's why they have the hex hole in the axle. Going from the opposite side through the frame is easiest.

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    Also just an FYI, those axles look like they might be the type to use a DU Sleeve instead of a bearing, or a combination of both. If that is the case they may feel stiff the first couple of weeks you ride with them. That's normal if their a Sleeve, they require a bit of break in period but generally provide a longer life than other bearing types and self lubricate. This has nothing to do with installing them just a side note really. – Nate W Apr 21 '16 at 20:34
  • Yep - an 8 or 10mm fitting is normal. Many bike tool kits stop at 6mm, or maybe 7mm if you have the magic shimano weird size. – Criggie Apr 22 '16 at 1:08
  • @Criggie 10mm seems awfully big considering the pedal axle diameter, I have seen 6mm and 8mm in shimano pedals. – sjakubowski Apr 22 '16 at 17:42
  • @sjakubowski I know - I was gomsagged to see it too. Look Keo Easy cleat pedals definitely have a 10mm hex socket in the end. Coincidentally I'd bought a new set of allen keys that week, which went up to 10mm. – Criggie Apr 23 '16 at 0:04

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