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Is there any bicycle with calorie burn meter in market? Its not the one on the gym. Normal bicycle for outdoors. Is there any bicycle like that in market? I have a project for my school work. Really need your help. Thank you. I'll appreciate any comments.

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Generally, you attach a bike computer or a power meter to a bicycle to collect statistics, and/or some sensors to yourself.

A bike computer measures the revolutions per minute of a wheel, typically by attaching a magnet to a spoke of the wheel and using a detector attached to the frame which tells the computer every time the magnet passes the detector (so the number of times the magnet passes the detector per minute is the revolutions per minute; the circumference of the wheel gives distance). This gives you information like speed. These are cheap -- maybe 10-20 dollars on the low end, and various exercise apps can estimate calories burned based on the speed data (sometimes automatically from things like ride logs, and possibly with additional parameters you can estimate). A GPS can also take position and time measurements and do calorie estimates, albeit probably less accurately than a bike computer.

A power meter is often built into a special crankset (or occasionally bottom bracket or hub or pedals). It uses strain gauges to measure your power output based on your pedaling. This gives you watts that are delivered through your drivetrain. These are often quite expensive -- on the order of 1000 USD, typically. Using data from this, you can approximate the power you're using (under some appropriate models), which would give you the rate of calories burned.

You can also attach things like heart rate monitors and O2 sensors and other sensors to the person's body. From these, again, with appropriate models, you can estimate the calories burned. These are in the middle in price -- my bike computer came with a heart rate monitor strap, and bike computers that have this feature are available in the 100 dollar range (probably less; mine came with my trainer). Generally, this calculation will come up in terms of VO2 max (which you can estimate based on how quickly you can run), age, gender, weight and the heart rate. This can be supplemented with other sensors as well.

I'd venture in terms of accuracy, combining a heart rate monitor (and maybe other sensors) and power meter would be most accurate. However, in terms of cost, just using a decent heart rate monitor (i.e. with a chest strap; not something like a FitBit) is probably the best for budget. The cheapest option would likely be using the bike computer and entering the speed data into some app, but this is likely the least accurate option.

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    This is a comprehensive answer. I add that some cellphone apps can combine GPS coordinates with your weight and some fancy backend systems to estimate power and energy used. Accuracy is a crapshoot - for example strava.com/activities/486911478 I doubt this ride used 8,000 kJ However as a comparison between rides using the same system might be acceptable as a percentage change. With some modern android cellphones they have an ANT+ receiver, so a cheap chinese ANT+ heart rate monitor may be all you need. Mine was $20 USD. – Criggie Apr 28 '16 at 11:30
  • I have actually found the differences between a fitness app calorie burn and a heart rate monitor to be very, very small. I have a Polar setup on my bike, and I have done many rides on it putting the data into LoseIt.com and found the differences to generally be 5% or less. – Deleted User Apr 28 '16 at 17:34
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    Theres probably some function of riding style and terrain thats important too, for them to be close. – Batman Apr 29 '16 at 0:33
  • Excellent answer, although Hills (obvious to everyone) and the less obvious Wind speed and direction (road), Short steep hills, sharp corners with braking and hard vs soft surfaces (MTB) make any Calorie meter not using at least HR or preferably Power nothing more that a toy to generate bragging rights. – mattnz May 3 '16 at 22:30
  • @Criggie A nice 3km ride. See Rule #68. – andy256 May 4 '16 at 1:49
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I am in Toronto and I have an App called Toronto Cycling (developed by Brisk Synergies) that records my trips with a calorie count and distance, speed etc. I think its a really good app but I am not sure if it would be available to you in your city. I googled Brisk and seems like they work with municipalities and cities for Urban Planning and Infrastructure. Maybe your city has something similar or maybe your project could use this as app for its purposes.

Good Luck

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