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This question is in regards to my X-treme trailmaker bike. I removed the rear wheel in order to replace the inner tube. However, I cannot seem to reinstall it properly. When I tighten the two nuts on each side of the rear wheel (pictures at http://imgur.com/a/cPNNE), the wheel no longer moves.

However, if the nuts are not completely tightened, the wheel falls out.

I thought the resistance may be from the disk brakes, but loosening that didn't resolve the issue. Any help would be much appreciated.

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  • Hmm. Attempted to edit the pics in using my phone, but it didn't work. – andy256 Jun 22 '16 at 14:10
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    Are you sure that the washers are in the right order and at the same place (outside/inside of the rear fork)? Check bicycle manual! – Carel Jun 22 '16 at 14:18
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    As above. The one of the washers might be needed on the inside of the drop-out. If it isn't - it could it be you are loading the cone against the bearings of the wheel? – OraNob Jun 22 '16 at 14:30
  • How much did you disassemble things? If you took the axle nuts all the way off it's possible you put washer between the nut and that lugged thingie when originally it was placed on the axle first and should be on the "inside" of the frame's "dropout" slot. But my money is on something being mucked up with the disk brakes. (This bike is quite unusual and so we have to guess about the details.) – Daniel R Hicks Jun 22 '16 at 19:58
  • That is one CLEAN bike! – Criggie Jun 22 '16 at 22:08
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I'm going to say that you have the axle washer on the wrong side, should be inside the dropout rather than on the outside, doing so can stress the disc brake as it was aligned with it (the washer) on the other side, or your simply pushing the frame into the rotational surface so much that it can't move due to the pressure on the entire surface rather than just the axle.

Basing my answer on experience and reading through this

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When it's in the wrong spot ( on the outside ) you are also pushing the frame against the surface of the hub which when tightened enough will prevent it from being able to turn. Washers prevent this by adding both space and reducing friction between a moving object and a static one. Essentially a bearing turns fine on an axle but if you sandwich something up against the entire surface of the bearing it wont move due to the friction present on the entire surface area rather than just the axle sleeve.

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  • From the OP's pictures that does not appear to be the case. – Daniel R Hicks Jun 23 '16 at 0:27
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    This worked. thanks so much! It's funny how the operation of the whole bike depends on the placement of just one washer, but I'm glad it was an easy fix. – fdzsfhaS Jun 23 '16 at 0:43
  • Glad it helped! – Nate W Jun 23 '16 at 14:55

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