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As I get more and more used to my bike's aggressive geometry, I'd like to slowly remove the spacers. I have two right now and my LBS who did the fitting said you can remove them as you get more used to riding aggressively.

If I were to remove these spacers in the future, do you need to readjust any other parts of the bike to maintain a 'good fit'? Or will compensating elsewhere simply negate the effect the removed spacer will have (in terms of getting more aggressive/aero)?

Can I simply remove a spacer and be done with it? Or should I get a refit while removing a spacer?

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    Please make sure you know how to properly adjust a headset if you plan to remove the spacers yourself. Jun 27, 2016 at 14:58
  • Thanks, I'll be sure to make sure I know what I'm doing (or try to learn) before going at it. I'll likely just ask my LBS to show me once as I still have free fittings for this year.
    – Abubakr
    Jun 27, 2016 at 15:41
  • Is this a road or mountain bike. No difference in the answer, but I would like to suggest that lowering your handlebars should typically be done if you are uncomfortable with their current position. I have seen very few road bikes sold with handlebars at a "too high" position.
    – Brian G
    Jun 27, 2016 at 16:23
  • This is a road bike. I am comfortable with how it is now. My fitter told me that you can remove the spacers over time as you get more comfortable in order to achieve a more aggressive position.
    – Abubakr
    Jun 27, 2016 at 17:20

2 Answers 2

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You can remove them, but you may have to make small adjustments elsewhere (bar angle, seat, etc.). I wouldn't bother with getting refitted to the bike since the perturbations required are not very large, and you'll likely guess good ones naturally.

Start by removing a spacer, riding a while, seeing how you like it, then go by feel on what (if anything) you want to adjust.

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  • Sounds good, thanks! Since my LBS offers unlimited refits for a year, I'll likely ask them to remove one and see what they have to adjust to compensate and use that as reference for the future.
    – Abubakr
    Jun 27, 2016 at 15:41
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No need for a refit, but I would have the bike shop do the work if they'll do it for free. Normally the washer is just moved from under the stem to the top so no cutting of the fork steerer tube is required.

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  • Oh! That's neat, I didn't think of that. Nice way of avoiding cutting.
    – Abubakr
    Jun 27, 2016 at 17:21

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