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In my particular case, I would quite likely be using something like a GoatLink so I can use an 11-40t or 11-42t cassette on a home-built recumbent tadpole trike (so, single rear wheel). I'd like to use it with a triple crankset. Are there any reasons for me NOT to just add the derailleur hanger in about the location it would be with the GoatLink installed?

Goatlink derailleur hanger extension

How far behind and below the axle center should the derailleur hanger threaded hole generally be? Either in a general case, or for large range cassettes in particular.

What are the downsides of it being too far down or too far back? I would have to guess that as total distance from hanger to axle increases, that shifts to/from the higher gears (smaller tooth counts) would be "less crisp". Maybe ground clearance as it moves too far down? Maybe not enough chain around the circumference of the cogs as it moves too far back?

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    I don't know how this plays out with trying to replicate what a Goatlink is doing, but if it helps, as far as the bike industry is concerned, there are published dropout geometry specs from Shimano, SRAM, and Campy (really it's just the other two following Shimano I think), and frame/frame part manufacturers work off those. – Nathan Knutson Aug 16 '16 at 3:08
  • according to the manufacturer o the GoaLink "The GoatLink is simply the fastest route to improved wear and long-term shifting performance on wide-range 1x10 drivetrains using the Shimano Shadow+ Rear derailleurs." Doesn't this mean that a triple chain ring is NOT compatible? – David D Apr 4 at 18:14
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Note on the rear of the Goatlink, there is a lump which should sit on the original rotation stop.

Shimano includes these diagrams in their rear derailleur documentation: Shimano gear hanger guidance
(source: peterverdone.com)

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