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Ive just started TT on my road bike and looking at slowly adding components to improve my time....aero bars seem next logical step but need some advice on how to progress? Thank you

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    Consider that every dollar you spend tt-ifying a road bike is money you can't put into a dedicated TT bike. Look on ebay for cheap used clipon aero bars - don't buy new. If you like the posture then consider buying a TT bike. – Criggie Aug 14 '16 at 23:39
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I followed a similar path. I was road riding then entered into a couple of TT's. I soon thereafter bought aerobars off of Ebay. Riding at that angle is different and takes a little getting used to. I then decided to get a TT bike, but instead of just buying one, I bought a frame and all parts on line, mostly from Ebay, scouring for the best prices on what I wanted that were either slightly used (mostly) or new. I ended up saving almost $4,000 doing it this way instead of buying a ready to go bike and I learned a lot in the process. I did have my local bike shop put it all together for around $100. Good luck.

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There is plenty of info on web about this topic.

The general consensus is that aero bars give the biggest time improvement per dollar spent. See this Cycling Tips article, which goes on to say that the next bang-for-buck improvements are: a skin suit, shoe covers, aero helmet, TT wheels.

There are a few things to consider though.

  • Aero bars will mess with your bike fit, so get a fitting done to a) take full advantage of them, and b) avoid injuries. You'll probably lift your seat and move it forward a tad.

  • Aero bars are less useful on hilly / twisty courses. Do your research on this.

  • This Bike Radar article discusses these and more issues. And this Cycling-Inform article rehashes the general advice.

Happy racing!

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