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I recently go my hands on a nice clean Titanium triathon frame. Together with my mechanic of trust I built up a sleek and fast city bike, using 650c wheels.

titaniumbike

Since I ride throughout the year, I want to fit some mud guards to it. I've looked a lot of places, whether in bike shops around town or online (i.e. SKS). So far I haven't found anything for 650c wheels... Another tricky issue is the lack of threads for fixing the bars. So ideally the guard should be fixable like this Crud Roadracer Guard Set. And of corse, the frame being built for triathlons, the geometry is rather tight so there isn't a load of space between frame and wheels...

I know it's a tricky question but I'm curious about any suggestions or tipps regarding a pair of mudguards.

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    There does not appear to be enough clearance in the brake arches for conventional fenders. Consider splash guards attached to the down tube and below the seat. – Daniel R Hicks Oct 14 '16 at 11:50
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Given that you don't have the eyelets and barely any tire clearance, you're going to want a clip-on seat-post fender (which you could also clip to the seat tube, probably):

enter image description here

and a mudguard that clips on to the downtube:

enter image description here

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Ok, so after some research and some creative thinking I came to this solution:

  • Used SKS Raceblades (intended for 700c) and adapted them to my 650c wheel size - they're surprisingly easy to fit
  • Used a piece of old tyre and put it in the gap between break and seat post to protect this area from water and mud

The first test this morning was a great success - wet roads but my shoes didn't even get damp a little bit.

rearwheel_1 tyre_protection

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    I was going to suggest this, I've got these on my commuter which had 700c tyres and they offer great coverage . – ynnekkram Oct 24 '16 at 7:00

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