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I need to stay fit and cycling is a great non-impact exercise. I don't see the point in sitting when cycling, instead I rather standing as such as it creates a better form of exercise. Are there any bicycles that are designed without a seat specifically for this purpose?

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    The market for this is so small that, unless you're filthy rich, you're much better off just removing the seat from a regular bike. Any "seatless" bike would have to be a custom design and hence incredibly expensive. – Daniel R Hicks Nov 2 '16 at 17:46
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    @DanielRHicks Why even remove the seat? One can stand on the pedals just fine with the seat still there. – David Richerby Nov 2 '16 at 18:37
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    You might want to clarify why standing is better exercise; I don't agree! – srank Nov 2 '16 at 19:20
  • @DavidRicherby - Well, I suppose it could get in the way. And the frame design would be a factor too -- some frames are designed for a long seat post and would be very low with the post removed. – Daniel R Hicks Nov 2 '16 at 19:20
  • Edited question and tags to try to be more on focus for this se. – RoboKaren May 1 '17 at 19:53
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You can get a trials bike. They often do not have a saddle or seatpost, by design.

They are meant for doing tricks, jumps, balancing, etc. This doesn't sound like what you are doing but if you must not have a saddle, or post, this might be an option for you. This is what they look like:

enter image description here

You might want to just use a regular bike and stand up instead as it will probably ride better for normal riding while standing.

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Most trials bicycles are designed without a seat. However, they are likely to be uncomfortable when ridden for long distances.

You may want to consider what what you mean by "stay fit". Fitness must have goals to be obtainable. Cycling is generally consider to be cardio exercise that improves aerobic fitness. Standing while cycling is more of a strength training exercise that is less maintainable over time. I don't know of any manufacturers that produce a bicycle meant to be stood on all the time and intended for distance. It's not something people try to do often, so if their is one, it would be very small, selling to a niche market.

  • Trials bikes also tend to have very low gearing, which is another aspect of "uncomfortable when ridden for long distances." – David Richerby Nov 2 '16 at 18:41
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I would be willing to guess if ridden correctly equal amounts of exercise could be made from standing up versus sitting down.

However.... BOOM problem solved. enter image description here

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Some options which existed before, but apparently disappeared. Both are essentially a fold-down scooter with pedals+chain.

Pedalflow is still available in some countries for about $400 USD.

Impressions: The small front wheel and high center of mass imply a particularly front-tippy ride, should the rider find a pothole with the wheels, or otherwise have to make a quick stop. The Occam cycle raised about a third of its kickstarter target, and was not funded.

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    Welcome to SE Bicycles. Good points, but we really prefer answers to be self contained, in case the remote webside changes or vanishes completely. To that end, I'll make a couple of minor edits to enhance the answer without changing the meaning. Do have a browse through the tour and learn how SE is a bit different. – Criggie May 1 '17 at 9:20

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