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I'm trying to buy a new wheel for my mountain bike and I went online and was lost in the different specs of the wheels.

I currently have a 1×9 on the bike. I don't know anything else about the cassette or wheel because I bought the bike used.

I plan on getting a new groupset as well, do I need to buy both the wheel and set at the same time?

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    We need more details (e.g. if the frame runs disc brakes, wheel size, if it uses a thru axle, and what kind of upgrades you intend to make). – Batman Jul 5 '17 at 22:31
  • There are a large number of standards of axles types and hubs these days. sheldonbrown.com/frame-spacing.html helps with spacing (although I don't think this is complete now), then you have QR or through axle options. – mattnz Jul 5 '17 at 22:53
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    You probably should head down to a local shop and see what they've got/can get. Note that many wheels you buy online might need a bit of truing when they come out of the box, which by the sound of things you're going to need a shop to do. – Batman Jul 5 '17 at 23:57
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    By the time you pop for a rim/hub/spokes and cassette/shifter/chain/cables and maybe a derailleur, you could be better off replacing the whole bike. Bikes by parts are funny expensive like that. – Criggie Jul 6 '17 at 1:19
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    My current wheel isnt tubless ready and im tired of the rim tape, and its just to heavy. Im not replacing my norco sight because of my wheel – Owen Benson Jul 6 '17 at 6:20
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To answer the other part of your question, No you can upgrade the groupset later.

Assuming you buy a wheel with an 11 speed hub, then your existing 9 speed cassette should fit it, and an 11 speed cassette is the same width but with thinner chain. You'll need a new chain of course, and a right-hand shifter that has 11 positions not 9.

You should be able to use the front chainring as-is, subject to wear.

I can't say whether you will need a new rear derailleur or not - you should get away with the current one, but its not guaranteed.

New shift cable and housing too because why not?


Since you've mentioned Tubeless in a comment, probably best to add new tyres and sealant. Add a spare tube to your pack as well, for bad punctures. If your front wheel is not tubeless compatible, you're up for a new wheel there too unless you only want tubeless on the rear.

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