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This question already has an answer here:

I have Trek 1.1 with currently 700*23C tyres.

I need to replace them but the one available in market are 700*28

Can I use this size as replacement?

If yes, what'll be advantage and disadvantages?

marked as duplicate by mattnz, Argenti Apparatus, David Richerby, Criggie May 26 at 22:03

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    Possible duplicate of Will 26 x 2.0 tire fit on bicycle with 26 x 2.125 size tire and about a million other "will this size tire replace that sized tire" questions. Only difference is detail of width. – mattnz Jan 30 '18 at 20:02
  • Are you looking for a specific brand of tire? You don't have to stick with the tires that came with your bike, you can often shop around for much better ones. This would allow for a much wider variety in widths (you'll still want to keep the diameter at 700). – Jonathon Jan 31 '18 at 12:59
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    Given its a road bike this question is more about frame clearances than whether 28 is an acceptable replacement for 23. Your easiest option is to buy a single cheaper 28mm tyre and fit it, see how it goes. I have about 1mm of clearance at the brake bridge on my road bike with 28, its only barely enough... but it is just enough. – Criggie Feb 2 '18 at 12:00
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Your rims can almost certainly take the extra width. The real question is can your frame, forks, and brakes? Only you can measure that.

Based on nominal dimensions (and some approximations) you would need an extra:

  • 2.5mm either side to the chainstays/seatstays and forks/brake arches.
  • 5mm above (to clear the brakes) and in front of the back tyre.

    A few bikes even have the front wheel very close to the downtube. This assumes a very similar tyre to the one you have, just a bit bigger. You need to add a bit for safety margin, plus you need some clear air between the new tyre and the frame. So do you have enough clearance around the tyre?

The 28 should give a slightly more comfortable ride, and may even be more efficient. You'll need a slightly lower pressure.

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    On many road bikes the brake arch is also a sticking point (sometimes the main one). – Deleted User Jan 30 '18 at 16:36
  • @DeletedUser that's why I said "on top" but now I realise that could be interpreted as "additional" rather than "above". I was trying to avoid terms related to circle geometry. Plus there's the sides of the arch I'll edit. – Chris H Jan 30 '18 at 16:42
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    Correct. I found that if you don't specifically call out the brake arch, people will forget to look in there. – Deleted User Jan 30 '18 at 16:49
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    @DeletedUser I'm quite tempted to say it would be a good idea to tape a couple of layers of cardboard to the existing tyre and see what they hit, if anything. – Chris H Jan 30 '18 at 16:52

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