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I have a (within last year) rockshox Deluxe R rear shock on my bike, on some hills I would like the added stiffness of a locked out shock. Do upgrade kits to add lockout exist or would I need to buy another shock?

(My bike is a 2017 Whyte g170)

Cheers all.

  • Not sure how you'd manage it on that rear shock, but I've always figured you could lock out front shocks similar to those shown by buying some rigid plastic drain pipe of the appropriate diameter, sawing it in half lengthwise, and strapping the halves onto the shocks. Maybe wedge a few layers of old innertube around the ends to cushion things a bit. Would have to look at the setup in person to see if something similar could be made to work for the rear. – Daniel R Hicks Jul 30 '18 at 23:43
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    @Daniel you are joking? – Swifty Jul 31 '18 at 8:20
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    @Swifty - Nope. It wouldn't work on all designs, and some care would be needed to avoid damage to the adjacent pieces, but there's no reason it couldn't be made to work. – Daniel R Hicks Jul 31 '18 at 11:07
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    @DanielRHicks usually lockouts are turned off and on repeatedly throughout the ride. I don’t think your plan is practical. – Rider_X Jul 31 '18 at 17:15
  • @Rider_X a novice like me with lockout but not remote may well ride to the trail locked out then ride unlocked, or maybe lock off for one big fire road climb. So Daniel's idea could be useful on an even cheaper bike. Or for a day of light forest trails. But I'm not sure I'd fancy it. – Chris H Jul 31 '18 at 18:52
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Lockouts are performed internally within the shock, often by closing out part of the dampener circuit. This would make it nearly impossible to create a general upgrade kit as shocks can have very different internals (even from the same brand).

The only possibility would be a lower end shock that shares its shock body with a higher end version that has a lockout feature. In this case you might be able to purchase the internals of the higher end version. Even then you may be missing components such as the lock out lever, plus the lower end version may be missing ports for the lockout lever.

Purchasing new rear shocks is another possibility, but it can be quite expensive and there are a lot of measurements to get correct (e.g., eyelet to eyelet length).

In short I don’t see any easy upgrade path.

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