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How do you optimize the recruitment of our glutes when using a more upright bike?

According to an answer for a previous question, rolling the hips forward slightly makes the glutes easier to recruit on a road bike. A high tail saddle helps too. Which position adjustments maximize the use of the glutes in a road bike?

With a more upright position like on a hybrid bike, the hips look rolled back more than on a road bike. Does that mean bikes fitted like a road bike are necessary if you want to exercise your glutes?

If that's true, then it seems like indoor cyclists should be using road bikes on a trainer or a stationary bike with an aero position for a more complete and balanced workout, to reduce the risk of muscle imbalances, and also have gains that are more transferrable. The gluteus maximus is the biggest muscle in the human body by volume. If we want more power and endurance, we should be targetting them.

Is it possible that the rule is different for more upright bikes? If so, what should be done to the bike fit or pedalling technique? Would increasing the setback increase glute recruitment? Should the saddle be lower too?

Update: To be clear, when I used the term upright, I was referring to the posture of the cyclist rather than bikes that are non-recumbent. In this case, more upright meant bikes such as hybrid bikes, city bikes, Dutch bikes, and mountain bikes rather than road bikes, touring bikes, or cyclocross bikes. For someone who wants to target his or her glutes with an upright posture, rolling the hips forward may not be a good idea because the back can be hyperextended which could lead to pain or even injuries to the spine. There must be a way to target those muscle groups on bikes allowing less aggressive positions. Hopefully, someone would have an answer. The intent here is to increase the options so that whatever bike we ride, we can have a good workout whether if we don't see the need to go faster.

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