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I am attaching pictures of the rear hub of my Giant XTC Advanced 29” 1.5 2017. The hub is manufactured by Formula.

I am unable to extract the bearings. I'm tapping hard from the side of pawls, bearings are supposed so be released in the other side but instead they don't move a milimeter and I am afraid of tapping even harder. What am I missings?

Thanks.

UPDATE: Picture with outer bearings and spacer extracted, and inner bearing held by circlip.

outer hub pawls side

outer hub cassette side

inner bearing with circlip

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    I have a Formula hub with a similar freewheel and also wondered how to extract these bearings if such need arises. Did you manage to find some service manual for it to be sure that it is not a "blind" bearing installation? Additionally, there seems to be two bearings and a spacer between them. Are you sure that your extraction tool contacts the right bearing? – Grigory Rechistov Jan 22 at 11:10
  • I have not found any manual, asked Formula but not replied. What is a "blind" installation? I'm pushing from the pawls side, the "tool" I'm using contacts the metal inner ring of the bearing in the picture (at least that seems to me to be the rotating inner ring of the bearing), not the area in orange. Thanks! – Patricio Montes Jan 22 at 11:19
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    It does not look like it can be removed from the pawls side, as the diameter is smaller there. A blind hole is one that has no exit at one side. A special tool is needed, here is an example of how to use it: youtube.com/watch?v=27YCUMzKcfE – Grigory Rechistov Jan 22 at 13:21
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    @GrigoryRechistov - Yep. I have a simpler tool (which I'm not sure would work in this case) which has spring-loaded tines. You insert it and then use a punch from the other side to pound on the tines. This is a bike-specific tool from maybe 1990. – Daniel R Hicks Jan 22 at 13:25
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    @PatricioMontero I am so glad that you managed to do it! I really hope that I won't need to repeat your steps, but I've already changed bearings in my front Formula hub, and there is no guarantee that those in the rear hub won't require similar treatment at some point. – Grigory Rechistov Jan 23 at 13:09
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I haven't done this one in particular, but here are some things that may be applicable:

  • The spacer between the two bearings may be a tubular spacer that with the axle out is simply held in place by friction. If so, with some persuasion you can nudge to one side, allowing you to hit the outer bearing with a punch from the inside out.
  • The inner bearing may be held in place with a circlip you presently can't see, keeping what you're trying to do now from working. It's been a while but I believe this is how Campy freehubs are put together.
  • An expanding collet type bearing extractor looks like it could work here. Here are the ones made by Wheels Mfg. The whole kit is expensive but individual ones are pretty reasonable. You'd do the outer bearing first and see what that uncovers once it's out.

wheels extractors

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    No need of an expanding collet: "with some persuasion you can nudge [the spacer] to one side, allowing you to hit the outer bearing with a punch from the inside out." It did it! "The inner bearing may be held in place with a circlip you presently can't see" You are right again. I'll try to upload a picture. Many thanks! – Patricio Montes Jan 23 at 9:58
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    Can I upvote again 👏 – Swifty Jan 23 at 10:45

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