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Kiddiecarrier jogger/stroller. Any tips on how to convert/attach to a bike?

enter image description here

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    I've no idea what the answer is but I have a feeling that somebody who needs to ask a question like this probably doesn't have the skills necessary to do the conversion safely. – David Richerby Feb 15 '19 at 13:35
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    Might be a better option is to sell the current Jogger, and purchase a bike trailer with Jogger conversion. – Michael Gardner Feb 15 '19 at 14:13
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    Some models can be converted with a manufacturer's kit. This could plausibly be one of them. Check the exact model to find out. If there's no kit, forget it, or consider it a project in building a kid-safe trailer using this as a source of parts - do you have the skills/time to do that properly? – Chris H Feb 15 '19 at 14:20
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    Do you want to build something or buy something ? – Criggie Feb 15 '19 at 23:48
  • Thanks all for your insights. I 'inherited' this and not sure of the model. Was preparing for sale and wanted to buy the conversion kit to sell with, but take on all points to leave unless it has a manufacturer's conversation kit. I really appreciate everyone's time and input. Thanks – DTA Feb 17 '19 at 0:25
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I suggest you flip up the pram onto its back "wall" and have a close look at the chassis.

Here's a kiddicarrier 202 model with the tow-arm extended

enter image description here enter image description here

If you don't have the structure to hold a support arm you will have to buy or make one.

If the support arm is there but folded away then you may already have what you need.

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  • Thanks Criggie - thjnk it's best to leave as a jogger but do appreciate the time and explanation. – DTA Feb 17 '19 at 0:27
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If you’re transporting kids then I’d stick with the manufacturer’s conversion kit if they have one. If they don’t have one, then I’d sell your trolley and buy one that does have a conversion kit. You don’t want to explain to your spouse or parents why their kid/grandkid died in a horrific accident when your DIY trailer hack came apart in a busy intersection.

Otherwise, if you’re carrying cargo the DIY conversion isn’t hard. You just need to first decide if you want to put the hitch on one of the axles or tow from the seatpost or rear rack. There’s advantages and disadvantages to both. I have a question of here that lays it out.

Fabricating and mounting a drawbar isn’t too hard. The folks at the hardware store can help you bend pipe or conduit and sell you pipe clamps to mount the drawbar.

Then you need to buy a quick release or make your own. They’re not hard to make but hard to make well. They sell kits on amazon.

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