4

I have a next to unused GP5000 road tire, 25mm, which unfortunately has three cuts in the sidewall. I would like to ask, if it these constitutes a safety problem - or if they rather are to be looked upon like regular cuts in the tread. What is the verdict: dead or not dead? Thanks, Morten

enter image description here enter image description here

  • I would not use that or trust that to hold at 90psi. I'm not sure how that's happened unless it's been ridden while flat or it's a fake continental tire, that's certainly been used – Dan K May 27 at 11:25
  • 2
    I don't think it is a fake. I bought it second hand from a trustworthy person, who has gone tubeless. He also reimbursed me. So no harm done in that respect. – Jensen May 27 at 11:54
  • 10
    Sliding the sidewall against sharp rock or curb does that kind of damage. Don't ask how I know. – ojs May 27 at 11:58
  • 3
    It might get you ten miles, but I wouldn't bet on 100. – Daniel R Hicks May 27 at 11:59
  • 1
    @Jensen any chance you can post a picture from the top angle, I am interested to see the tread pattern, Grand Prix Continentals have a distinct pattern. – Dan K May 27 at 12:44
14

I would not ride that tyre. Pretty sure I can see tube in the second photo, and that's asking for a sudden blowout.

You might choose to put a boot/patch on the inside of the tyre, and use this as an indoor trainer tyre only. Might be okay on rollers, would make a great front-wheel tyre for a direct-drive trainer (ie, the wheel that doesn't turn at all.)

I certainly would not ride on the road with that ever.

It is dead, buy a new tyre.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    It does look a lot like tube in the 2nd picture, but in that case there's no pressure in it. I've caused similar damage and the tube was bulging out (a boot got me home then I retired the almost new tyre) – Chris H May 27 at 14:49
-4

Of course not.

Why are you risking your life on the word of a bunch of internet strangers you're never going to meet or be able to hold accountable?

Go to a qualified specialist and have the suspect tyre examined…

Whatever else, please remember that if it does fail and any kind of law-enforcement finds out you Posted this query, you will have no weakest wheel to stand on.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    What are you talking about? You do realize that this is a bicycle tire, not a car or motorcycle tire, right? Taking a spill from a bike is very rarely life-threatening, there wouldn't be any passengers, and law enforcement is not going to know or care that some bicyclist somewhere had a blow-out. – HiddenWindshield May 28 at 3:11
  • Welcome, I'm not sure about the passengers comment either, it's not a motor vehicle so shouldn't be carrying passengers, but absolutely we must remember the safety of other road users and not just ourselves, when weighing up a safety issue. – Swifty May 28 at 6:53
  • @Swifty yes, that's not the sort of tyre you'd be likely to use on a kid-carrying bike – Chris H May 28 at 19:01
  • Sorry I mentioned passengers. [edited to focus on answer] – Robbie Goodwin May 29 at 23:53
  • 1
    Yeah I messed that comment up, got all excited. Rubbie I was actually trying to bridge the gap and bring the focus back to the good point I think you are trying to make, that we should think about others and not only ourselves. Do note that the other answer very clearly says not to use the tyre, it has had a lot of upvotes and has been accepted by the asker - indicating they will be heeding this advice. – Swifty May 30 at 20:59

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.