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Hi I used to cycle quite a lot and about 26 years ago bought a men's trek singletrack 970 which I loved. That eventually got stolen, and I haven't ridden for many years, but when I tried out some bikes at the beginning of the year they all felt like I was sitting upright which just felt wrong!

I think times have changed with bikes (and I'm older so maybe not so flexible but hopefully don't have to go to a ladies bike yet!) But I would still like to try that geometry before I give up! Any ideas of brands/models that might recreate that position?

Stock photo of this model

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  • You question would be greatly improved if you were specific about what type of bike you are talking about - mountain bikes presumably as that what a Trek Singletrack is. Also you could specify what models you tried recently. Jun 16 '20 at 18:16
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    You know its possible to buy a used trek singletrack on ebay or craigslist or similar? Just got to find a good example somewhere near you.
    – Criggie
    Jun 16 '20 at 20:41
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It’s awesome that you’re getting back into riding again. MTB style bikes have gotten a lot more sit-uppy in the years since you last purchased a bike. Their geometry has gotten a lot more slack and the headsets a lot shorter and the wheels are bigger so you tend to sit “in” the bike rather than stretched over the top of the bike.

This might be an occasion where you should talk to your local bike store to see if an MTB is still what you want or whether a gravel bike which is a modified road bike with fat tyres but still has drop handlebars, might suit you better. It really depends on the terrain you want to ride on.

A good store might be able to recommend changes like a slightly longer headset to an off the rack bike to stretch you out a bit too. Also some brands tend to be longer in the frame than others.

Good luck with your search.

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  • Thank you so much that's really helpful...I thought it must've gone that way - it wasn't just me! Good to be back into riding...we've got our trek tandem sorted too! one positive from the awful situation of covid. Jun 16 '20 at 16:17
  • I have almost no MTB experience, but this sounds like good advice. It isn’t clear if the OP is looking to regularly tackle trails that are best suited for an MTB. Gravel bikes in general are a good neutral recommendation, and they can often handle single track. That said, @PamelaHobart, can you clarify where you want to ride? Single track, dirt and fire roads, just ride around town or bike paths, mix of tarmac and dirt/gravel, or something else?
    – Weiwen Ng
    Jun 16 '20 at 17:53
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    If you want something that is roughly comparable to the Trek Singletrack, you used to have, some hybrids are now essentially what a mountain bike used to be: cockpit geometry closer to a road bike and rigid forks (although they have ETRTO 622 or 584 wheels rather than 559). The Specialized Sirrus X is a good example. Jun 16 '20 at 18:24
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This may not be the road you would like to go down, but have you considered buying used? Instead of trying to find a new bike to recreate an old experience you enjoyed, why not try to find a quality used, refurbished bike similar to your beloved 970?

Bonus, if you do not end up enjoying the used bike, its value will not have decreased nearly as much as trying to sell a new bike that has now become used. Less skin in the game overall, and could hopefully get most of your money back if you decide you want to go a different route.

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  • Welcome to Stackexchange! Great first answer - keep it up. You can read the tour for some background and a badge, and have a go at answering any other questions of interest.
    – Criggie
    Jun 16 '20 at 20:40
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Hi I used to cycle quite a lot and about 26 years ago bought a men's trek singletrack 970 which I loved. That eventually got stolen, and I haven't ridden for many years, but when I tried out some bikes at the beginning of the year they all felt like I was sitting upright which just felt wrong!

You should seriously consider drop bars.

Drop bars have two major benefits over straight handlebars.

Firstly, drop bars are designed for an aerodynamic position where part of your weight is supported by your arms. This is the opposite of an upright position typical on most straight bar bikes.

Secondly, because on very long rides your arms will become tired if you stay continuously in the most aerodynamic position possible, drop bars offer many other positions too. You can keep your hands in the drops, in the hoods, in the corners and on the short straight section of the bar. Thus, a drop bar bike allows at least four different positions some of which are more upright than others and some of which are more aerodynamic than others.

Don't believe the people that tell you that drop bars are not suitable for anything except smooth pavement. You can perfectly well ride a drop bar bike in a forest trail. If riding outside smooth pavement often, just put some wide tires with a non-slick tread pattern. Cyclocross is just like that; riding a drop bar bike outside of smooth pavement.

Heck, you can even have drop bars on a bike having suspension fork! (I had such a bike after converting a straight bar bike with a suspension fork to drop bars.) However, you probably will find that drop bars allow you to easily use your arms as suspension, so with drop bars a suspension fork is not a necessity like it may be with straight bars. So, for example cyclocross bikes do not have suspension forks whereas many mountain bikes do.

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