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My housemate bought a spinning bike since all fitness places are closed due to corona. It has an ordinary (non-road/mtb) saddle which creaks when pressure is applied on its edges (nose, back, left/right). The sound appears to originate from the saddle rails itself.

We've tried replacing it with another saddle, but the sound remains. We've tried taping the rails, hoping to reduce metal to metal contact, but the sound remains.

How can I reduce the creaking sound of the saddle? I've included a picture of the saddle below:

enter image description here

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    It might help to identify where the creaking noise comes from. While the clamp is a good suspect, there can be creaks from the plastic/covering of the saddle, as well as the seatpost/frame interface, or right down to the BB and pedals. Try getting out of the saddle while riding and see if the noise stops. Also get an assistant to listen from the side while you ride, to help triangulate the source of the sound.
    – Criggie
    Dec 24 '20 at 21:18
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    Usually when I hear creaking it's my knees! Dec 24 '20 at 23:54
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    The creaking is really the saddle. I've removed the saddle holder with the saddle and I could reproduce the sound from that sub-assembly alone. Also, when my housemate stands up on the bike the sound disappears. Dec 25 '20 at 8:32
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Try a light drop of a wet lube perhaps one that you put on a bike chain at the points of contact on the saddle rails. That helped on some SPD pedals and my cleat that made a squeak every now and again as I rode.

Hope that helps.

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    I've tried this before and it does actually work, but needs fairly regular re-application.
    – Andy P
    Dec 24 '20 at 14:59
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Possibility 1: Take the clamping system apart and clean the parts. Then reassemble with the metal to metal contact surfaces properly greased.

Possibility 2: Replace the saddle with one of better quality as the most probable cause for creaking could be the saddle itself, especially where the rails are lodged in the shell. If you want to go a step further and if the bike allows for this, replace the seatpost as well with one of better quality to get rid of the ancient one bolt clamping device.

The kind of clamping device that holds your saddle has come out of use and has been replaced by one-piece posts for mainly two reasons: weight, though this is not a problem on a spinning bike but also because the serrated surfaces work against each other through the dynamics of the moving cyclist, thus bringing in play into the system and requiring constant tightening, hence the squeak. They also permit incremental tilt adjustment only which is less precise than with two bolt seat-post heads.

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After greasing every part of the saddle, rails and clamp the creaking would not stop.

After a closer inspection I found that the welded pin on which the clamp is fastened (outlined in purple) was moving ever so slightly, squeaking a bit when it moved in the square tubing. The weld itself is on the clamp-side of the square tube (not visible in the picture).

The lower part of the pin sits flush in a hole of the square tube. Adding some oil there (where the yellow arrow points) solved the problem immediately.

enter image description here

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Take apart the clamp, clean it and put a light layer of grease on all the metal to metal parts. You can also add a little grease to the seat rails. Often the creaking is a result of dirt and grit stuck in between parts. be sure to tighten everything down well. if that doesn't work check that the seat itself is not creaking because of a crack in the plastic or the metal rails moving inside the seat where they meet the plastic part of the frame.

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Lube will work. Just make sure you do it regularly.

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    Thank you for joining the site - do take a minute to go read the tour and see how things are organised. This answer adds nothing new that the existing two answers don't already state, so instead upvote the ones you think answer the question.
    – Criggie
    Dec 24 '20 at 21:16

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