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I have a threadless setup with no spacers above the stem. What is the simplest way to raise my handlebars?

enter image description here

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    Good question - this is the opposite from bikes that have a "chimney" of spacers. Once you cut a steerer, its a commitment to that length, and difficult to back out. – Criggie Mar 8 at 12:03
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    Re-cabling brakes and shifters may be needed depending on how much the bars are raised. If the bars are raised, this removes slack from the cables. Bars should typically be able to rotate 180 deg. from front, i.e., completely reversed. – John Mar 8 at 20:50
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One or more of the three options

  • Change the stem to one with an angle, with such a short stem height gain will be limited.
  • Replace the bars with a riser bar, these will give up to 40mm, maybe more of you shop around
  • A stem extender (proviso - not on a carbon steerer).

Presuming no carbon parts (bars, stem or steerer), replacing these is well within the capabilities of of anyone who is moderately DIY capable with basic tools (Hex keys should be all you need).

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    A stem extender has a "minimum extension", I believe around 50mm. – arne Mar 9 at 2:50
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You can get another handlebar with a different value of "rise":

Rise in handlebars

Explanation

There are models with very high rise:

High rise

You can go to the extreme (might be very flexy, but OK for e.g. commuting):

Extreme

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    Or the more expensive solution: a new fork with a longer steerer. – Carel Mar 8 at 8:13
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    The Specialized Hover handlebar is a riser drop bar, which isn’t what the OP asked for but might help someone else. I am not familiar with the touring space, but there may be some riser touring drop bars also. Otherwise, this design isn’t common for drop bars. – Weiwen Ng Mar 8 at 11:13
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    In terms of the price, cheap decent aluminum handlebars are only marginally more expensive than cheap decent stems. – Grigory Rechistov Mar 8 at 11:34
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You can buy a handlebar riser adaptor like this: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/510DPDSJLYL.SX679.jpg

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    Presumably you can also buy them from other retailers. – thosphor Mar 9 at 9:41
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    @thosphor good point I've removed reference to seller because it doesn't seem necessary – Swifty Mar 9 at 19:18
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Replace the stem with one that has a bit of an angle.

Stems are available in many combinations of lengths and angles, so if you're dissatisfied with the reach on the bike too you can solve that in one go as well

Every respectable LBS should have a ton of options on hand.

Btw many forks require a minimum of one spacer above the stem, especially those with carbon steerer tubes. You should double check your stem is installed complaint with the manufacturer's requirements.

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  • Thanks. I'm the original owner of this bike and never messed with it, so I assume it's okay. My wife's new Trek FX looks the same, with no spacers above the stem. – Mastiff Mar 8 at 18:41
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A web image search for "stem riser adapter" will locate literally hundreds of sites selling handlebar height increasing adapters - from all the usual large sellers plus numerous smaller outlets.

The image at the bottom of this answer provides a random sampling of examples.
(Click image for larger higher resolution version).


Here is a useful Stack Exchange Q&A re the safety of using such extenders.

Here are a number of SE questions re handlebar extension.

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(Click image for larger higher resolution version).

enter image description here

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