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I want to use bar-end shifters instead of downtube shifters on my '85 Koga Miyata Traveller, but I don't know if it can be done easily.

I believe all components are original, because the derailleurs are:

Front Derailleur Shimano FD-A105, 105 Golden Arrow

Rear Derailleur Shimano RD-A105, 105 Golden Arrow

I guess, I need friction shifters, because it's easier, right? If it's also possible to use indexed shifters, which would you suggest?

For example, would they work: https://vintagenosbicycleparts.com/suntour-bar-end-shifters-accushift-plus-7-speed-barcon-nos/ ?

Any hints/suggestions are much appreciated.

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    Welcome. Please do not hide important information behnd links. I have editted the types of the derailleurs in. I suggest taking the tour.
    – Vladimir F
    Mar 21 at 20:09
  • Thanks for editing.
    – Dackel
    Mar 22 at 9:27
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Generally speaking, friction shifting works fine as long as you have the skill to shift, and that the shifter can pull enough cable to cover the whole width of movement needed.

Bar end shifters can be friction, indexed, or switchable between both.

Your existing derailleurs are probably fine to use with any friction shifter.

The linked Golden Arrow ones are quite vintage and will command a high price to find in decent condition.

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  • "The linked Golden Arrow ones are quite vintage and will command a high price to find in decent condition." I already got them on my bike (I updated my original post) and thankfully they actually are in decent condition. "Bar end shifters can be friction, indexed, or switchable between both." I mostly found indexed shifters and some which might be switchable. But as you said, "and that the shifter can pull enough cable to cover the whole width of movement needed" How do I know if a shifter is capable of that? Is there a certain spec I have to look for? So far, thanks for your input.
    – Dackel
    Mar 22 at 9:37
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    @Dackel if a shifter was from a 5 speed era, it might not be able to pull enough cable to actuate all the way across a 6/7/8 speed cassette (8+ speed cassettes are roughly the same width) For a lot of mix-matching, its really trial and error.
    – Criggie
    Mar 22 at 10:10

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