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Is there a way I can fix the mount of this bottle cage so it is more level?

The handle bars on the bike are shorter than my old bike.

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4 Answers 4

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Two options:

  1. Mount the bottle cage so that it's to the front of the bar rather than the rear. That way you can move it all the way towards the clamp (like you did with the reflector).
  2. Rather more extreme/costly, but using a flat bar rather than a riser bar eliminates this angled section
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    If the OP had spacers above their stem, they could potentially go to a flat bar and move it up. If they go to a flat bar, that will change their riding position in a more aggressive direction (probably decrease stack by ~15-20mm?). Potentially the swap could be handled by a consumer, though.
    – Weiwen Ng
    Oct 8 at 0:02
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    @WeiwenNg On a MTB I doubt most users would notice 20mm of stack height too much. It's not like on a road/gravel bike when you are spending hours in the same position - as soon as things get technical you are shifting your weight around a lot. But yes, you are completely correct
    – Andy P
    Oct 8 at 0:54
  • OTOH @AndyP if the position was already pretty aggressive that extra couple of cm drop could make quite a difference to your neck in a descending, standing on the pedals, posture. It certainly would with one pair of sunglasses I have as I'd be trying to look through the top rim, which demonstrates that it can be marginal. Or you'd end up riding on locked arms, or sitting down more
    – Chris H
    Oct 11 at 6:15
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The bracket that clamps to your handlebar is an interesting solution to mount a bottle cage there. I am not sure it can be totally secure, but if it works, it works.

Another possible solution is to get a soft bag that straps to the stem and the handlebar. They may be called stem bags. Some examples are here. The image below links one from REI. The fabric loop that mounts to the handlebar may twist enough that the bag itself isn't angled.

Otherwise, we usually mount cages in the main triangle. Some MTBs don't have space there. I am not 100% sure what MTBers normally do, but I understand that hydration bladders in backpacks and hip packs with bottle holsters are common solutions.

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    Also fork-mounted cages are a possibility, though reaching isn't trivial (I add some when I want 4 bottles)
    – Chris H
    Oct 11 at 6:52
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Instead of clamping it to the rear of the bars, consider attaching it to the rear of the stem.

Mind out for knee interference while pedalling, and absolutely check for any binding of the steering - you don't want your coffee cup to cause a fall.

Or remove it completely, and simply finish your drink before you ride. Noone wants other road users to be distracted while on the road.


An additional reason for not having your drink on the bars is that liquids slosh and have momentum. If you need to do fast/accurate steering or if you hit a pothole/bump, the liquid can noticeably upset your steering and force you onto a different line.
Don't have your bottle on the forks either, for the same reason.

I would suggest moving the bottle cage to the bottle cage mounts on your frame. If there aren't any, ask a bike shop to install some, or use your pictured clamp onto the frame.

If there's not room inside the triangle, add the bottle cage on top of your top-tube or behind your seatpost.

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    On a long bike ride, you need water. :-)
    – fixit7
    Oct 7 at 13:13
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    That last sentence came out of left field. Is that really a reflection of how you feel about taking water on a ride?
    – Paul H
    Oct 7 at 18:16
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    @fixit7 Paul, I made an assumption that this is for one of those insulated coffee cups, not a water bottle. OP's original title was Problem with cup holder mount I'm totally in agreement with the need for water, but not hot beverages.
    – Criggie
    Oct 7 at 22:40
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    If this is an MTB actually being used on trails, I wouldn’t recommend a behind the seat cage. Those are considered to be triathlon things, and they may eject bottles on rough terrain. Plus if the OP feels like they need a cage on the handlebars, it may be a stretch to reach behind the saddle for a bottle.
    – Weiwen Ng
    Oct 8 at 2:27
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    @fixit7 there are some nice rigid stainless vacuum insulated bike bottles. I wouldn't drink hot drinks while riding, but in a second cage they're good for winter rides. Some insulated cups fit too, and some seal tight. Or I've got a thermos that's a good fit in a bottle cage, but you have to pour it out.
    – Chris H
    Oct 11 at 6:50
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There is a product specifically for mounting a bottle on your bars. We try to avoid specific product recommendations here, but this is the only example I'm aware of.

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  • There used to be (maybe still are) quite a few different products for this purpose - i've got one in a box somewhere that i ended up never using. The one you linked certainly looks like the best one i've ever seen though
    – Andy P
    Oct 10 at 22:36

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