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I made some bike grips using a noodle. I would like to put a rubber sleeve over them.

The outside diameter is 2.25 inches.

I thought about this but am afraid it would be too wide.

Inner Tube, 26 X 4.0

Looking for suggestions.

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  • How well do those grips resist twisting? With the large diameter and probably-not-very-grippy interior, I’d be concerned that they would rotate while riding.
    – RLH
    Commented Oct 21, 2022 at 7:44
  • They rotate some but is not bothersome. @RLH
    – fixit7
    Commented Oct 21, 2022 at 13:36
  • How rough of terrain or busy traffic will you encounter on this bike? An unexpected rotation of the grip during sharp maneuvers can throw you off the bike.
    – RLH
    Commented Oct 21, 2022 at 19:09
  • I ride on flat terrain and slow traffic. But after an hour of riding yesterday, my hands were numb. I am hoping the bar tape will give more cushion. @RLH
    – fixit7
    Commented Oct 21, 2022 at 19:11
  • Can I ask, what exactly is the problem you're attempting to fix here with 2.25inch grips? Grips that size, particularly when you include the rotation seem incredibly unsafe. The numb hands you've mentioned is that before or after fitting these? Would also consider some glue to stop the rotating weather bothersome or not
    – Hursey
    Commented Oct 27, 2022 at 23:31

1 Answer 1

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It's not exactly rubber, but heatshrink sleeving makes for a good grippy surface. I've used it to repair and bulk out grips on tools for example. It's normally used for electronics, and is available glue-lined (normally black) and in many colours. I buy mine on eBay.

You buy it oversized, and heat it with a heat gun to make it shrink by a factor of about 2 (or less if there's something in the way). A hot hairdryer will shrink it to some extent but not fully, and may not activate the glue. Larger sizes are sold by flat width rather than diameter, so you would need a shrunk size of π×d/2 for diameter d. Your 2.25" (57mm diameter) will need about 90mm after shrinking, so something like 150mm (6") flat width before shrinking. The ends can be cut slightly long and shrunk fully. Note when looking at the larger sizes, you want the stuff that looks dull and rubbery, not shiny. The shiny stuff is less grippy and thinner.

Another option is to tape it like drop bars, either using bar tape, hockey tape, or even an old inner tube. You'll need to secure the outer end, which is normally done with an end plug but you don't have that option. The inner end is normally finished with adhesive tape but your foam is soft enough that the tape won't work too well. Glue-lined heatshrink would make good finishing tape in this application.

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  • I went with the handlebar tape that has end plugs. @Chris H
    – fixit7
    Commented Oct 20, 2022 at 15:41
  • You may struggle to get the end plugs to work well with the extra padding - good luck
    – Chris H
    Commented Oct 20, 2022 at 15:57
  • The tube ending is unobstructed, so I see no problem. The tape will be going over the foam part. @Chris H
    – fixit7
    Commented Oct 20, 2022 at 16:48
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    @Criggie if directed properly the heatshrink will see hotter air than the noodle, and anyway only the surface could possibly suffer (roughen a little, which would be no bad thing on the smoothest ones) as the foam is too good an insulator for the inside to heat up.
    – Chris H
    Commented Oct 21, 2022 at 7:29
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    @Chris H I added a pic to my post.
    – fixit7
    Commented Oct 27, 2022 at 20:25

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