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I recently purchased a Giant Propel Advanced Pro and the bike comes with Giant's new tubeless-ready SLR1 hookless rims with Cadex tyres. Since purchasing, I have had a few punctures and have decided to run the wheelset with a tube. One huge problem I am facing with these rims compared to others I have had is the sheer amount of force required to take the tyre on and off the rim in the case of a puncture. Even once I have removed the tyre from the rim, to ensure it becomes seated, I have to pump it up to >120psi (something that I can't do with a hand pump on the side of the road).

I have considered getting a new set of tyres to see whether the same problem persists but I was wondering if anyone else has had the same issues as me and has been able to fix it. I would greatly appreciate any help in this matter as I am getting rather frustrated with getting punctures and being unable to fix it whilst out on the road.

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    Can you clarify if you know the standard procedure of pushing the beads into the rim well? You may already know this, but not everyone does
    – Weiwen Ng
    Oct 22, 2023 at 11:26
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    @WeiwenNg Yes I am aware of this
    – JayP
    Oct 22, 2023 at 21:44
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    @Criggie Where I am the roads are pretty rough and the tubeless, as you said, wouldn’t seal. I had sealant in the tyre and I am currently running 25mm tyres with a tube at 100psi. I need to put 120psi in to make sure the tyre seats initially. When I was running tubeless I think I was running 80-90psi. Could this be a problem?
    – JayP
    Oct 22, 2023 at 21:48
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    Hookless rims are rated to a max pressure of only 72 psi per the ETRTO standard. I would recommend not exceeding that. I think you should be able to get the tire seated with less pressure? I do inflate my tubeless canister to 130-140 psi, but that doesn’t produce a tire pressure of 130-140.
    – Weiwen Ng
    Oct 22, 2023 at 22:06
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    @DoNuT Getting punctures I am completely fine with. It's just a matter of techniques to get the tyre on and off the rim after a puncture to, for example, replace the inner tube. I'm finding it near impossible to do without some wrench to grip onto the tyre and then pull off the tyre. This certainly can't be done by myself on the side of the road.
    – JayP
    Oct 24, 2023 at 1:57

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