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I came across this tool on Amazon India, to remove the bottom bracket.

I don't know what this tool is called.

I've seen similar tools at motor workshops, so I'm assuming it is a common tool and not just specific to bicycles.

When I asked for the name of this tool, the mechanics called it something in their local lingo.

I want know what this tool is called in English.

2 Answers 2

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That is a pin spanner. The photographs and product listing were made by someone who doesn't know about bikes.

You never put it on sprocket or gear teeth. Also, to know the tool you're buying is useful for the purpose you need, you need to know the size of the pins, because there's a few sizes out there on various parts. Based on other pictures of the same tool elsewhere on the internet, this is probably on the chunky side (around 2.9-3mm pins, comparable to Park SPA-3).

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It is true these are used to remove the kind of single speed freewheels that don't have removal tool fittings, such as the one pictured. The outer race is removed with the pin spanner and the inner race is clamped in a vise, and then you throw the whole thing away and put a new one on.

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I would call it a Pin Spanner, and I agree with Jeff, there's no way it would remove a freewheel. These are designed to fit into a pair of holes in a cover plate where there is no space for a hex fitting. They're not common on bikes, but the end-plate of a freewheel might have such recesses.

Birzman calls it a Pin Wrench and looks similar to your example.
https://www.birzman.com/products_2.php?uID=2&cID=28&Key=130

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Park has the SPA-2 at https://www.parktool.com/en-us/product/pin-spanner-red-spa-2 which looks like this:

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    @mellowmonk In your lowest picture, there are two holes visible in the side of the freewheel. That's exactly the fitting for a pin spanner to use. It will do nothing as pictured. Also, I wouldn't pay more than a few dollars for that junk tool - it would be lucky to survive its first usage.
    – Criggie
    Feb 19 at 23:36
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    I do want to remove an old freewheel that has those 2 round holes (pretty sure there is a term for it). I'll be glad if the tool works a couple of times, once for the removal & once for the installation. The tool's cost is about $4 here. Will get it to take it to tool shops as a reference to find a better quality tool for future restorations. Feb 20 at 8:04
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    One of my friends said that he has a similar tool that he uses it on the angle grinder. But its way too smol for bicycles. Feb 20 at 8:07
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    @MellowMonk yes the angle grinder also uses a pin spanner style. They normally come with a tool that has pins at the right separation for the grinder and generally work well. The tool in your pictures has a hinge and will adjust for holes of variable spacing. Do note the diameter of the pins is fixed and should be a close fit on the holes - more metal is better here to prevent snapping.
    – Criggie
    Feb 20 at 8:39
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    Yes, the angle grinder ones have much fatter pins than anything I've seen on a bike. But the Park, while it might have the right diameter, tends to spring out if you need to apply a lot of torque. Next time I'd get one like the Birzman
    – Chris H
    Feb 20 at 11:03

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