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For cyclists who want to do long distances, is there a waze-like app to get directions? How do you guys plan for "long distances" trips?

I would like to do it in France, anyone from anywhere can answer.

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    I believe Komoot is used by many, but what functionality is it exactly that you are looking for?
    – Berend
    Commented Jun 15 at 13:15
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    I would like an app that suggests safe trips for cyclists.
    – mle
    Commented Jun 15 at 15:11
  • @mle: what do you mean with "safe"? Commented Jun 20 at 10:28

1 Answer 1

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Komoot, RideWithGPS, Strava route builder etc. will try to generate a reasonable route, and have phone apps that help you follow a route.

Some will route within the phone app (just like a car satnav) but the best routing service for you may not pair with the best navigation app.

I plan a lot of long distance routes, mainly using Komoot (in road cycling mode) but other tools as well, and with heavy use of custom control points. That takes place on the desktop. Then on my waterproof phone I use IPbike, which can be run with offline mapping and in aeroplane mode, saving lots of battery. While I'm in the UK, I have used Komoot for planning a route in France; the experience was the same.

A lot of people prefer a dedicated GPS bike computer when they're on the road. I want better quality mapping than any of those offer, on a big clear screen, with hassle-free downloading of my routes.

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  • Are the proposed routes safe to ride as a cyclist?
    – mle
    Commented Jun 15 at 15:17
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    @mle can any road be considered totally safe? They try pretty hard to route down minor roads, and those popular with cyclists - that's very much not the same thing though; consider how many journeys are logged by commuters choosing a direct route. I'm more likely to force the route onto bigger roads to avoid a convoluted wiggle with unnecessary hills. Google street view is helpful in assessing those roads
    – Chris H
    Commented Jun 15 at 17:08
  • Anyway, my experience of French roads is that they're safer than English ones to start with, at least in rural areas. By being a little quieter there's normally a safer overtaking gap soon, reducing the impatience of drivers
    – Chris H
    Commented Jun 15 at 17:10
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    I get your point. I just do not want high speed roads to be recommended.
    – mle
    Commented Jun 16 at 11:18
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    You won't get very far without roads that have an 80km/h limit in France, just like I couldn't get out of the city and suburbs without 60mph limits. What all route planners try to do to some extent is minimise the amount of higher-classified and higher-speed roads, taking to account the presence of bike lanes. So in the French system it would prefer C roads over Ds, but some places are only reachable with single carriageway 80km/h routes nationaux. Here unclassified roads are preferred but Bs and As are unavoidable, some with low limits, a few higher
    – Chris H
    Commented Jun 16 at 11:26

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