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8

MTB rims branded 26" measure 559mm to the bead seat, which converts to... 22 inches. You already have 26" wheels. They're called 26" because when you put an ordinary 2" wide tyre on them, the outside diameter is about 26".


7

A 26 * 1.75-2.125, 47/57-559 tube should be fine for a 26 x 1.75, 47-559 tire. Tubes can appear to be a little floppy and oversized on a rim before inflation. Remember the tube expands radially inwards and well as outwards as its cross-section diameter increases as it is inflated. Try inflating the tube a little before inserting it between tire and rim - ...


6

Wheel & tire sizes are a source of unending confusion. The more you learn, the more confusing they get. 29" mountain-bike wheels have the same bead-seat diameter as modern road bikes: 622 mm (which are sometimes referred to as 28" wheels in Europe, which is confusing, because they're slightly smaller at the rim than 27" wheels…see what I mean?). When ...


5

Amazon web pages says Stop-a-flat tubes are "Size Specific" to a tire and care should always be taken when matching the tube to the tyre. But then Please note that the 1.75 sizes will fit a 1.90 standard tire. So that's confusing. You'd really have to check with the manufacturer, Bicycle tires vary in actual size for a nominal width specification by ...


4

Simple answer 29er wheels roll better that 26" wheels this means better rollover and higher speeds. These are good things for mountain bikes. The trade off is, because they're a larger wheel they require a larger frame. This is especially true for suspension. Usually 29er don't have the same range of suspension as 26" wheels. The larger wheels compensate for ...


4

If your campus is like most I have ever heard about, you want the cheapest bike that will do the job. Bike theft is a common thing everywhere but campuses where a lot of young people are in need of bikes are certainly not less risky than average. Most students I know look for second hand bikes, either at the university, online or where they grew up/have ...


4

Here are potential issues that may or may not arise from such solution that I see. Geometry changes. As it has always been, control that the head tube angle of the bike changes in a way that does not worsen its handling. I, for one, use 27.5+ wheels and tires with a fat bike fork made by Surly originally shipped for 26" wheels with 4.8" tires. However, the ...


3

Honestly, it seems that you want too much of everything at the same time: cheap, good, compatible with your depreciated frame suspension fork. You might reconsider your constraints. Compatibility comes first, otherwise there is not much sense in getting a new fork. You'll need something for 26" wheels and with a straight 1⅛" steering tube, which is not what ...


3

The key measurement you need is the axle to crown length required. It's the distance from the center of the axle to the bottom of the frame head tube. The axle to crown length takes into account both wheel diameter and suspension compression distance. Axle to crown length is easy enough to measure with a fork installed in the frame. Don't forget to also ...


3

It will be on the squirrely and unstable side, especially if ridden aggressively, but this combination was common when narrow MTB rims were more fashionable and ubiquitous, so it will in all likelihood function without major incident. You can do it but probably shouldn't.


3

It can sometimes be done, but usually you will run into problems. Major problems: Brake compatibility: Rim brakes do not reach the rim in its new position. Disc, drum and coaster brakes are not affected. Pedal clearance: Pedals will now be closer to ground and will hit the ground if you are not careful when turning. Minor problems: Steering will be ...


3

If you look at bike literature from the early 29er years it was the best thing to buy. There were some issues that showed up after they became common enough for recreational riders. Recommended frame sizes tended to put people on a frame that was actually to large. It seemed that they forgot about the top tube being raised 1 1/2 inches by the larger wheels. ...


3

Most likely no. That is too big of a difference in wheel sizes. The frame does not likely have enough room for the larger wheels. If you have rim brakes there would also be the problem of adjusting the brake pad position for the larger wheel. You could always go to a shop or swap wheels from another bike just to see if they will fit, but I think it is very ...


3

I doubt it has 22" tires/rims - more likely the rims are 26" or 29" (in which case it should be listed as a Rockhopper 29) and the tires are 2.2" (and the seller forgot the decimal point). 22 inch wheels on bicycles are pretty much a botique item for BMX, and certainly wouldn't be found on an adult sized bicycle (and the kids bikes from Specialized are ...


3

Yeap- no reason not to. I do the same on my mountain bike, I prefer the width of the wider rear to enable stability/grip whilst the front is just wide enough to steer in the direction. Most inner tubes will work over quite a range of tyre sizes & the same for rims. Make sure you check the specification of both if you are concerned.


3

I recently got into mountain biking (last summer) and I had to find the answers to all these same types of questions. The answer to your question is not a simple one. You actually have to answer a few more questions before you can know which is the right size wheel for you. First of all you won't want anything smaller than 26". You won't be able to roll ...


3

What you don't want to do under all circumstances is make large enough changes to the outside diameter of the inflated tire that pedal/crank clearance with the ground becomes an issue. Geometry will suffer too, but as a rule of thumb, dealbreaking ground clearance problems will arise first. (It's my rule of thumb at least, having observed various wheel ...


3

Rotor size is unrelated to wheel size, but your fork will have a maximum rated size. Any larger than the rated size will put you at risk of a (literally) fatal breakage. Disk brakes dump a lot of torque into the fork. Have a look near the calliper mounts and there might be advice on maximum rotor size. A bike of that vintage will probably want 180mm or 160mm ...


2

The strength of a wheel has comparatively little to do with its radius, and a lot more to do with the quality of the wheel building, and the number of spokes, and the design of the rim. If a frame is designed for a 700c wheel then fitting smaller rims will change the handling, and will 700c is 622mm in diameter, and 26" is 559mm, so you're dropping by ...


2

You are correct that smaller wheels can be fitted on a disc brake equipped bike, however, bikes are designed for a particular wheel size and changing that size can cause lots of problems. If the drive train is not modified the gearing will be altered. More importantly the the steering geometry will be changed and crank clearance reduced potentially making ...


2

2.0 is the diameter of the tyre/tube in inches. So a 1.75" tyre will be smaller and slimmer, and probably a little faster. 26" is the diameter of the whole rim, but check the tyre for its ISO number to be sure. Its likely to be a ISO-559 size. answer: yes that rim will probably fit fine. You'll need to check and adjust rim brakes, or if its disc brakes ...


2

Acceptable fork travel is primarily defined by particular bicycle frame design, not by rider's height or other parameters. More specifically, it is important to maintain the same or close distance between the front wheel's axle and the fork's crown, as stipulated by the manufacturer, when changing forks or changing travel. If your fork is the original one ...


2

Hayes tech support recently returned my call on this, and although they don't have access to serial number records that far back, they did confirm that the 11-00 manufacturing date stamped in the arch almost certainly means it's MY 2001. They also sent me the tech manual -- I was impressed with Hayes' helpfulness!


2

Note that a 4" tyre would have less than 4mm of clearance on each side. If your wheel goes slightly out of true or starts picking up debris, it may rub or even jam.


2

Update: Fixed bad calculation for the BB drop, thanks to @mattnz. Physically, it may be possible to fit the fork alone. But the resulting bicycle will be dangerous to ride, for at least two reasons. The wheels with 26" rims vs 29" rims are at least (622 - 559)/2 = 31.5 mm or 1¼ inch lower, meaning everything will be lower, including the bottom ...


1

As Grigory suggested, I looked around online for a "vintage" decent fork and found a Manitou Mars Elite 26" 80mm fork from around 2000 for $120 in good shape. It'll be a fun learning experience.


1

As already said, and my addition, things that that won't fit or cause problems: brakes - if caliper type or cantilevers - won't fit. Roller brakes are wheel-dependent, disc brakes are partly wheel-dependent bottom bracket will find itself one inch (about 2.5 cm) closer to the ground - either you will experience pedal strike or you should replace the cranks ...


1

If tires are nominally compatible with the rims, it may still sometimes frustratingly hard to put them on. There are several tricks that helped me on many occasions. Make sure that tube does not get in the way. Sometimes it means using a narrower tube. In your case, having a tube marked for tires 26"×2.0" inside tires marked as 26"×1.5" will add extra to ...


1

No - the geometry changes, which messes the handling. Plus rim brakes no longer reach. Finding 26" rear wheel with a backpedal brake is unlikely. And finally it'll still be a big heavy beach cruiser but probably with thinner tyres (less cushioning) than it had. What is your goal? If you want a bike with 26" wheels it will be much cheaper to buy one. A ...


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