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13

The size of the tube is usually written on the box. Tubes stretch a bit so they fit a variety of sizes. For a 27 x 1 1/4 tire you would need one that says 700x32 which is the equivalent new size of tube, although both the old system and new system are usually written on the packaging. This size is very common and you should be able to purchase the tube at ...


6

In theory, a smaller wheel is stronger than a bigger wheel if hub and rim section are the same. This is largely due to the length of the spoke and it's contributions to the stiffness/flex vs spoke braking force. Whether the difference between a 27.5 wheel and a 29 wheel is in of itself enough to mean a real world differe, I don't think so. I think a strongly ...


5

It will depend largely on your handling skills and the conditions of the snowy, icy city you live in. Narrower tires, like what you have will cut through small amounts of snow quite easily, but will quickly bog in deeper snow and can be difficult to control when you can't see irregularities underneath the snow. Since they also need to be run at higher ...


5

The difference between 622mm rims on 29” wheels and 584mm on 27.5” wheels is only 19mm - about 3/4 if an inch. If you run a narrower tire the rim plus tire diameter different is even less. In general bike frames do not have clearance for larger wheels so this may not even be possible. Note that larger wheels will also change your steering geometry.


5

You will probably need to drop your brake calipers. I did this on my 1981 Raleigh. Despite fitting long-reach Tektro R559 calipers, the back wheel looked like this: There might have been another millimetre by fiddling, but not the difference I needed. Please ignore the dodgy-looking cracked tyre sidewalls... they where only for testing. Here's the drop-...


5

Technically it can be done. Different wheel sizes were used over the years, starting from late 1980s in some niche touring bikes, where front wheel was significantly smaller than the rear one. Mountain bikers have used a setup of 26" wheel at the front and 24" at the back, especially for downhill (even at World Cup level) at the beginning of this century, ...


4

Simple answer 29er wheels roll better that 26" wheels this means better rollover and higher speeds. These are good things for mountain bikes. The trade off is, because they're a larger wheel they require a larger frame. This is especially true for suspension. Usually 29er don't have the same range of suspension as 26" wheels. The larger wheels compensate for ...


4

Best to stick to 26" specific forks. 27.5 forks will alter your ride handling due to the increased fork offset/rake and increased axle to crown length. Increased fork offset/rank will reduce the fork's stability (ex. self-centering effect). The fork offset issue is a major issue, especially for higher speed gravity-assisted riding. The steering twitchiness ...


4

Yep, a standard 700C tube will fit a 27" tire (and most tube boxes bear multiple markings to indicate this). Just convert the inch width to mm to get the width of the 700C tube, if the box doesn't say the inch size. Tires, of course, are a different matter -- there is enough difference in rim diameters between 27" and 700C tires (which don't stretch like ...


4

No matter what the reviews say. No matter what anyone tells you. You need to ride this bike and decide for yourself if this bike does what you need it to do. According to Canyon's Spectral:ON spec sheet they are running: 27.5 X 2.5, 63-584 29 X 2.6, 66-622 From bikccalc.com Rear: Rim:650b/27.5 Tire:2.50 inch Rim (iso):584 Tire:63.50 Wheel diameter:711....


3

In lieu of more information about the bike, the best answer is probably not, but maybe. You can find some examples of bikes that came with 27x1-1/8" that also max out at that size, but they are not very populous relative to ones that could fit a little bigger tire. As always with questions like this, it all depends on the exact tires and rims in ...


3

Anybody has experience with different wheel sizes? You can look at the World Cup competition-level athletes running the "mullet" setup. Just use net search for "mullet bike" and "world cup". With a caution in regard to limited statistics we have now (UCI has allowed different wheel diameters to be used on sanctioned events relatively recently), what I can ...


3

There’s really no such thing as a low-profile bike tire, AFAIK. All bike tires take on a circular cross-section when inflated. You’ll need to use a narrower tire. Another more expensive option would be to switch to 700C wheels, which would give you another 4 mm of clearance (and a better tire selection). Cool bike, btw.


3

I have a 2017 Yeti SB5+. I too was running anywhere from 14-18 PSI when I first started riding it and I was getting a lot of pedal strikes, something I hadn't even thought of on other bikes. When I started riding on much faster downhill terrain the tire was wandering a lot and was very unstable. I swapped out my 2.8 Rekon on the front for a DHF and started ...


3

I know it is not cheap but if you are going to try spikes then go for some good tires that come with spikes and save your existing for summer riding. The base is imbedded in the tire so it has an anchor. As for if it will work for you? I think you just need to give it a try. Clearly studs will help. Again not cheap but a mtn bike with bigger studded ...


3

I've been riding a 26 back, 27.5 front for about 4 years now. It works great for me. It does significantly change the geometry of the bike, but that is exactly what I wanted. I had a relatively upright XC bike and the change in geometry gave me a slacker headtube and longer wheelbase. This does make the bike less of a capable climber, but it's a much nicer ...


3

You can do this and there are even bikes that are designed to do so, for example this bike here by a company called Liteville. This bike is not only intended to be used with mixed wheel sizes but does also allow to change the wheel sizes used. So why would one want to do so? Without having explicitly searched for reasons, I would guess that one can use the ...


3

I recently got into mountain biking (last summer) and I had to find the answers to all these same types of questions. The answer to your question is not a simple one. You actually have to answer a few more questions before you can know which is the right size wheel for you. First of all you won't want anything smaller than 26". You won't be able to roll ...


2

Yes- structural integrity and your own well being. 4mm is a lot of metal to remove in the scheme of things. If I were you I would be looking for a long reach brake caliper instead of modifying the dropout by removing material.


2

I had this same question so I did some looking around. Here's what I picked up -- The simple formula for figuring out which tire works for you. Take the amount of contact area of the tire on the ground and multiply by PSI you have in your tire. So, the "area" (width times length) of the tire along the ground, multiplied by the psi. So, 2" of tire down ...


2

This is definitely possible and some years ago, the combination of a 26" rear wheel and a 29" front wheel was somewhat popular (though still far from mainstream) in the MTB scene. These bikes are sometimes referred to as 69ers. Combining a 27.5" rear wheel (and thus 27.5" frame) with a 29" front wheel (and fork), should be relatively easy. As long as the ...


1

Wheel size probably doesn't matter that much, the one that would probably perform better is the wider one with more aggressive tread or the one with studs. However, once you get to a certain width (I'd say above 3.0) then tires can start to more easily wash out sideways on wet snow, which I get on my fat bike regularly, but not so much on my 29er or 27.5+ ...


1

Right about the time fat bikes were about to become popular, I put a 26x4" front tire (which has the same diameter as a 29x2" tire) on a 26" bike, without changing anything else. The result was similar to a 69er, raising the front hub by about an inch. Besides improving handling on descents (perhaps due in part to the wider tire), it really didn't affect ...


1

I terms of the "am I too heavy for my tires?" question, you can look for the specs on the tire maker's site. Schwalbe publishes a rated load for their tires, I'd expect that other reputable makers do as well. As a point of reference their Marathon Plus tire is rated for a load of up to 90 kg / 198 pounds in a 32-622 size (probably at 6.55 bar / 95 psi). ...


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