Hot answers tagged

30

You turn it on when riding on smooth surfaces or going up hill to improve pedal efficiency. It's hard to know if you will need it in advance because without riding the bike you won't know how well the suspension design handles pedal bob (the energy lost by the bike suspension compressing under pedal forces), try and get a test ride.


10

First off many forks have a remote lock out as an add on. Fox and rock shox especially. If it has a lock out, a remote lock out is likely available. Secondly, a nice fork that is set up properly for your weight shouldn't need to be locked out all that often. I have had a variety of great fox and rock shox forks that i only lock on long, steep, grueling ...


9

Not to be trite, but: Get out there and ride! I just tried out a 29 Plus mountain bike a few months ago, first time on a MTB in years. Felt really weird and disorienting at first, so I just rode on smooth gravel pathways for a while. Once I started feeling a bit more confident in it, I started going out of my way to run over small rocks, twigs, branches, ...


8

I've heard before that a smaller wheel is actually stronger, and this site states the following. Because a 26-inch wheel has a smaller circumference than a larger 700c wheel, the rim is structurally stronger and resists deformation from impact. Wheels that are 26 inches excelled at handling hard drop-offs and even crashes without losing their true. The ...


6

I'm betting that you need to install a brand new chain and a brand new freewheel / cassette, at the same time, and out of an abundance of caution, make sure they're the same brand. I doubt your friend actually ruined anything, the more likely scenario is that the chain is old and stretched, causing it to slip ( or it's the wrong length as Daniel mentioned ). ...


6

When you're riding on roads you, generally, have close to no need of suspension, but because you've got it you'll be wasting lots of energy which will be going into the shocks and not into the pedals and cranks. If you don't need the suspension, it's going to be much more efficient to be able to disable it. If you know that you're never (or close to ...


6

I disagree with all this talk of "wasting a lot of energy". When I am riding with constant pedal force, the suspension compresses very little, if any. The severe loss of efficiency occurs when power peaks to the pedals occur - sprinting or hill climbing. IMO the effect is very roughly up to 30% when sprinting. With climbing it depends on the terrain and your ...


6

A remote lockout might sound like a good idea in theory but in practice you will find it largely unnecessary for the type of bike you're considering getting. That's not to say that it wouldn't be nifty to have, but I think you'll find that you will use it so rarely that you might regret limiting your purchasing options based on that feature. Remote lockouts ...


6

Short answer yes, a hard tail 29 would be a good fit for what you have described. And it sounds like you already have a fun FS bike and a road bike so it only makes sense. The equation N + 1 comes to mind, where N is the number of bikes you currently own. 29ers roll like nobody's business, they don't accelerate like a smaller tire but the roll over is ...


6

A 29er MTB tyre and a typical road tyre share the same rim diameter, which is 622mm. So you want a tyre of your desired width and tread with 622 in the ETRTO code. Check out the internal width of your rims, they will have an ETRTO code of their own printed somewhere like 29-622, and you want to make sure the tyre is wide enough to suit the rim. I.e., a 23 ...


6

To find fast rolling tyres have a look at rolling resistance charts. Also bear in mind that narrow tyres are not necessarily faster, summarised by Jan Heine. MTB 29er tyres and rims have a bead diametre of 622 mm. Such tyres are designated ISO or ETRTO x -622, where x is the tyre width in millimetres. Some stores list such tyres by their old French ...


5

Wheel & tire sizes are a source of unending confusion. The more you learn, the more confusing they get. 29" mountain-bike wheels have the same bead-seat diameter as modern road bikes: 622 mm (which are sometimes referred to as 28" wheels in Europe, which is confusing, because they're slightly smaller at the rim than 27" wheels…see what I mean?). When ...


5

The difference between 622mm rims on 29” wheels and 584mm on 27.5” wheels is only 19mm - about 3/4 if an inch. If you run a narrower tire the rim plus tire diameter different is even less. In general bike frames do not have clearance for larger wheels so this may not even be possible. Note that larger wheels will also change your steering geometry.


4

With really good tires you might not need suspension at all. I put Marathon Plus tires on a hard-tail for commuting, and find that the heavier tire gives me confidence and suspension to ride harder than before over broken pavement.


4

Well, the main advantages of tubeless is that you can run lower pressures (which comes with better shock absorption and thus control) with less risk of flats (though you should always carry a backup tube). I'm not entirely sure on where the truth is in regards to weight, but I don't think its important. The disadvantages are still having to carry a backup ...


4

Although 29ers have been around since the early 80's they have only been in production from a major producer for the last decade. Trek was the first big brand to offer a 29er in early 2000's. Reasons why you may not of seen many are: Until the last couple of model years model years 29er's have predominatly been in the XC category (HT and FS) while ...


4

Simple answer 29er wheels roll better that 26" wheels this means better rollover and higher speeds. These are good things for mountain bikes. The trade off is, because they're a larger wheel they require a larger frame. This is especially true for suspension. Usually 29er don't have the same range of suspension as 26" wheels. The larger wheels compensate for ...


4

Technically it can be done. Different wheel sizes were used over the years, starting from late 1980s in some niche touring bikes, where front wheel was significantly smaller than the rear one. Mountain bikers have used a setup of 26" wheel at the front and 24" at the back, especially for downhill (even at World Cup level) at the beginning of this century, ...


4

The 29ers without front suspension exist, but they are a bit pricey since they come from niche manufacturers. Many people want SS drivetrains since they want pure simplicity. Surly ships some of their complete bikes such as the Ogre as rigid 29'ers (the Karate Monkey can also take gears). There are some other options though. One common option is the Kona ...


4

When 29ers first became popular many buyers found that many manufacturers did not adjust their size charts to allow for the increased standover height. Whether this is the case for the models you are looking at is impossible to tell without more information. With identical main frame geometry, a 29er will be taller than its' 26" counterpart. You really have ...


4

They fit, in the sense that you can install them in the frame (if the axles are correct, hub width is correct, etc). The problems are: The bike stands a few centimeters closer to ground. Which means less ground clearance for obstacles and cornering. Frames designed for smaller wheels take this into account Less trail at front, which affects steering Lower ...


4

I used to live in the Mojave desert and had that problem a lot. The only thing that seemed to work was a hard plastic strip that you can install on the inside of your tire, that's the first line of defense. Then I bought thick thorn-resistant inner tubes on top of that.


4

I never had any luck with sealants that go into the tube, even in northern countries where no thorns are present but only occasionally some broken glass. The only thing it did to me was leak, soil everything, clog the valve and prevent the patch to glue itself to the tube. Another alternative that you might consider is going tubeless with sealant that is ...


3

Pretty much been done to death with evangelistic enthusiasm on many forums. Smaller wheels - more agile and responsive, lighter/stronger, easier to control Larger Wheels - roll better over small obstacles therefore considered faster in straight lines, lower tire pressures (due bigger tire) provide more traction off paved roads. Slower to accelerate (...


3

I recently got into mountain biking (last summer) and I had to find the answers to all these same types of questions. The answer to your question is not a simple one. You actually have to answer a few more questions before you can know which is the right size wheel for you. First of all you won't want anything smaller than 26". You won't be able to roll ...


3

A remote lockout option is nice for changing terrain when you do not wish to stop to adjust the lockout suspension. As a commuter, you may find yourself stopping normally for various traffic intersections. It is at this point you could make an adjustment to lock or unlock the front fork before continuing the next section of your route. It may be possible ...


3

For the pinch flats all you really need is sufficient tire pressure. The first thing you should buy is not a bike but a good floor pump with a built-in pressure gauge. Then keep your tires inflated to a minimum PSI of about 2500 divided by the tire width in MM. (Eg, 90 PSI for 28mm tires -- I actually keep my 35mm tires at 100 PSI.) If the tire's ...


3

I've respaced a steel road frame from 130mm to 120mm for a track hub. It's super easy, although Mr. Brown recommends not doing this for a change as small as 5mm. I'd try a 135mm mountain disk hub with a 700c cross rim, this gives you the most correct breaking surface on both setups. The advantage here is that when you come to put the 130mm road wheel in ...


3

Yes, there are tires out there that are smooth and will fit that rim. Your rim diameter is 622mm. Same as most road bikes, most cyclocross bikes, many touring bikes, many hybrids, and some cruisers. Figure out your rim width in millimeters. It might be printed on the wheel somewhere, it might be in the specs for your bike, and you might have to borrow some ...


3

You can do this and there are even bikes that are designed to do so, for example this bike here by a company called Liteville. This bike is not only intended to be used with mixed wheel sizes but does also allow to change the wheel sizes used. So why would one want to do so? Without having explicitly searched for reasons, I would guess that one can use the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible