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9

Yes, there is. Shimano/SRAM & compatible seven speed is 5mm cog-to-cog, and eight is 4.8mm. Generally what you're trying to do here can't be made to work very well. There are some tricks that without any additional parts can increase the movement of the derailer, but not decrease it. Also if you have a true 7-speed-only chain (not common anymore but they ...


6

There's an old joke. Man says to his doctor "It hurts when I do this." Doctor says "Don't do that." If you've got a multi-speed bike and the shifting doesn't work well, the solution is to fix the shifting mechanism, not to avoid shifting. As others have said, the whole point of having multiple gears is to let you ride at a more efficient cadence, which lets ...


6

8 speed shifter and cassette, 7 speed derailleur? You'll be fine. There's no "probably" about it. 6-, 7- and 8-speed gear is all cross-compatible in terms of chain width. The only time you'd hit a problem is if the shifter and the cassette weren't made for the same number of gears, for example you could imagine a scenario (e.g. 7-speed cassette, 8-speed ...


4

1984 – Shimano introduced Dura-Ace 7400 series with Shimano Index System (SIS) the first successful indexed-shifting system in cycling history. It was a 6-speed (7 and 8-speed later) system with indexed shifters mounted on the down tube. From http://cycling-passion.com/dura-ace-history/ Your front mech is given as a FD7400B, which doesn't really carry a ...


4

Cold setting a 114mm to 130mm is significant. Usually the rule of thumb for cold setting is you can go up one step, such as from a 126mm to 130mm or 120mm to 126mm. A three speed freewheel bicycle is extremely rare and I'd personally leave it alone, it's just too valuable to risk destroying the frame.


4

For the shifter to match, you need to match the number of speeds, cassette width and shifter actuation ratio. For Shimano everything under 10 speeds (except 8-speed Dura Ace which most people don't have to care about) has the same actuation ratio, so all you need to know is the new shifters are 7-speed Shimano. These can still be bought.


4

Do you use the front derailleur? It seems many people in reasonably flat areas do not. If not, you are riding a 7 speed. Take a ride and notice what gears you are using, particularly on the steepest climb and the steepest descent. The lowest gear will be with the smallest chainring in the front and the largest cog in the back. The highest gear will be ...


3

If you are a casual cyclist on flat terrain, without a lot of stops you can get away with not changing gear very much. Learning how to effectively change gear at stops and as the grained changes can make cycling more comfortable and efficient. Never shifting is possibly contributing to chain problems. You will be putting more stress on the chain when you ...


3

Generally yes, the front mech can work acceptably with other sizes of chain. Since you will have a thicker chain than expected, the front derailleur cage may need to be widened a little to reduce chain rub. The actuation ratio is between your shifter and the chainrings, so a friction shifter will work perfectly, and an indexed shifter should be acceptable. ...


3

The 7-speed cassette standard has been functionally discontinued for new wheels. Most new wheels come in 8-10 or 8-11 speed compatibility. Since the 7-speed cassette bodies were shorter, you can install a 7-speed cassette on a 8-speed body using a 4mm spacer behind the cassette. Alternatively, as you said, you can use the 7 shifter on an 8 cassette, you'...


3

Adding two or four teeth to the largest chainring will not improve you high gear very much. Right now your highest ratio is 48/14=3.429. Going to 52 will get you to 52/14=3.714, which is not much of an improvement. It is better to focus on the rear, where 48/11=4.364 Going to a new wheel set you need to check that the wheel is the proper width for the ...


2

Personally I would not stretch it that far. Aside from spacing you should check if your frame has derailleur hanger, and cable stops. Lastly you would have to ensure proper chain line after the stretch, possibly requiring BB and/or crank set change.


2

Clearly this post is in regards to a newer Schwinn rather than the originals from the '50s and '60s, as the latter were all equipped with Sturmey Archer internal-gear hubs. Searching for "Jaguar" on the Schwinn website yielded nothing so apparently Jaguars aren't manufactured anymore. Getting a little more desperate, I consulted the Walmart website and ...


2

The easiest option is just stick to your original plan of changing ratios in the rear. There there should be Shimano compatible 11-28 or 12-28 freewheels out there. I found one made by DNP after a little googling. (Note, not a recommendation, just an example). You local bike shop should also be able to help you find a suitable freewheel. Re your other ...


2

Basically all the <=9 speed Shimano rear derailleurs are compatible with the <=9 speed Shimano shifters (excluding some old Dura-ace and a few other weird exceptions). So, you need to match: 1) Being within the capacities of the derailleur (max tooth, min tooth, chain capacity -- based on the chainring and cog sizes) 2) # of speeds on the shifter = # ...


2

There are some differences in chainring spacing between crank speed generations. But even within a speed generation, the spacing numbers are not truly standardized. That's one reason for the ambiguity you've found. Another is that with front shifting compatibility considerations on bikes in general, there are a lot of things one can do that fall under the ...


2

A 7 speed bike will have a very limited range of gear ratios compared to a 3x7 (triple front rings, seven sprockets in back, AKA 21 speed) bike. What your bike shop guy was saying is that the Treadway has the same low gears as the Marin, but sacrifices higher gears used for flat sections or downhills. If you live in an area that you regard as hilly I think ...


2

Since you're going to a lot of work, moving to 8 speed (or 9 or 10) sets you up for the most flexibility. The main reason is that you need a new rear hub with a cassette-freehub. There's no good way to convert a freewheel based wheel. Since you're buying a replacement hub/wheel, its no more work to pick an 8~10 speed one. The OLD of your bike needs to ...


1

Most of the time, the problems you mention can be fixed by removing the freehub completely, pulling the seal in back (note orientation) and running some combination of degreaser/solvent/oil/air/etc through it, depending on its condition and what you have to work with. There are some symptoms that denote something is broken (crunching, truly erratic operation/...


1

Two mechanical issues come to mind: Cross chaining. When you use the smallest or largest sprocket the chain runs at an angle, which is bad for wear and efficiency. It’s usually not much of an issue (since most people ride in the middle of their gear range) but probably not a good idea to do constantly. With two or three chainrings you should avoid the ...


1

Bad for you or the bike ? For the bike, I don't think so, unless the selected gear has the chain is "cross chained", this will wear the chain quickly. See: https://road.cc/content/feature/213468-cross-chaining-it-really-all-bad For your body, yes, maybe, if you need to put too much pressure on your knees when climbing. The goal of shifting is to keep a ...


1

If you want something nice, using an 8/9/10 crank here shouldn't be a huge problem but it may take some fiddling to work well. If it says 10, you will probably have to use .6mm Wheels Mfg spacers or similar under the large and small rings to avoid chain rub in some gears. Putting on an 8-speed chain will also help eliminate that problem and should still work ...


1

You need to figure if the chain is falling off the right, the left, or sliding forwards over the teeth. And at which end the sliding happens. Replacing the chain is a good idea, but if its been left too long then the teeth on the cassette can be worn to fit it. At extreme cases the chainrings can also wear with the chain. Most good bike shops will ...


1

Pretty sure that the MF series has the freewheel integrated with the cassette, so if you are going to a "pure" cassette, you will need to replace the freewheel and possibly the hub. You would need to replace the hub if you can't find a conversion to a non-integrated freewheel for your current hub. If the hub gets replaced, that could affect the disk as well....


1

Sheldon Brown to the rescue: http://sheldonbrown.com/gloss_ba-n.html#block Short for freewheel block; cluster. My understanding is that the bike has 7 speed shifters and for some reason 8 speed freewheel. Only 7 cogs work, so the seller is planning to switch to 7 speed freewheel. 7 and 8 speed freewheels nearly same distance between cogs, so wrong ...


1

yes it will work. I tested it already. 6/7/8 speed chains are all the same width. so meaning. the cassette's width is the same too.


1

Edit: First question, why did you replace the derailleur? Rear derailleurs don't really care about # of speeds - its the shifters which change the cable pull to move them around (so mixing shimano and sram can cause problems due to different amounts of cable pull). By RD not aligned with gears, do you mean the hanger / cage are bent? If so, go to your LBS ...


1

Just the act of rolling up your pant leg one or two times usually covers the problem of it getting caught in the gears. I've also resorted to tucking it into my socks. It seems silly to buy clamps and devices when these two "free" options are available. Nice that it's enough of an issue that it's being brought up online. When I started mountain biking, ...


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