31

The answer, as others have said, is "both." However, if you are only going to use one light, there is a disadvantage to that one light being helmet-mounted. When the light is mounted close to the eye, everything that is illuminated is "flattened" since, from the eye's perspective, there are no shadows to provide information about depth. In particular, it's ...


21

If, by stands, you mean bike mounted kickstands, then the reason most mountain bikers don't use them is three fold: Safety. The kickstand is usually a relatively cheap piece of metal, bolted on wherever it will fit. Its shape and style lend themselves to ending up in your wheel or otherwise damaging the bike, if they are not secured to the frame so they can'...


20

Minimally, you want to be able to tighten all of the bolts on your bike (likely a few hex keys will do this) and an appropriate screwdriver for adjusting derailer & brake pulls. Separate from a multi-tool, a pair of tire levers are the other tool you should carry with you. I would add a chain tool to the above list after being left in a state where I ...


20

The advantages of seat mounted racks are that they don’t require rear dropout rack lugs; some of the seat mount racks have quick release levers so you can easily take them off (while racing or transporting the bike, etc), and are many times the only option for a rear suspension bike. The disadvantages of seat mount racks are numerous: max luggage weight ...


17

I found something on the homepage of the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute. They have an article about bicycle helmet lights, listing the pros and cons of them: Summary: Lights on bicycle helmets can be useful, but must have a breakaway mount. Especially about the breakaway mount: The importance of breakaway mounts The first and most important rule ...


17

It's used for attaching a child seat similar to this one. The above site shows a clearer image of the part in question which might be useful to future visitors.


17

This is what I tell everyone to get first when they get a new bike: Seatbag, to hold the following: Spare tube (maybe two) Small multitool Mini-pump or CO2 inflator Tire patch kit 2x tire levers That assumes you have bidons and cages. Those six things should get you by for many miles and should get you out of any trailside emergencies. As with ...


15

tw: extreme anti-hipster /snark Ahh! The u-lock belt holder. The perfect accessory for hipsters, literally: Advantages: Everyone will know you're a hipster People may think you're into hardcore bondage No ugly plastic u-lock holder marring the beautiful lines of your pristine lacquer-coated steel fixie If you get mugged you have something to fight back ...


13

In my experience cheap lights die, and some more expensive designs are prone to failure. Bike shops sell cheap lights because that's all some people will buy, and better they have a dodgy light than no light (there are enough cyclists without lights already). All the factors you list come down to one or two factors, depending on whether you consider "built ...


13

There are no special requirements for a watch for cycling. A cheap watch from the supermarkt will do as well as a decent quality watch or a sports watch (besides sport-specific functions). Rain or road buzz might damage rather sensitive watches. Fixing a defect, loading the bike, or a crash also gives opportunities to damage a watch. Common sense will ...


12

Why not go for a cheap and simple bicycle speedometer? Apart from the time it can also show you speed and distance which is always nice to know. As gschenk said, there are no special requirements for a watch while bicycling, but I do think that it can get uncomfortable.


10

A little more information would be helpful. Are you riding a road bike or hybrid, or what? How tall are you? What is your inseam? What size is the bike? Without this information, the best I can do is: 1) 6-7 miles isn't a long ride. If you're getting numbness in such a short distance, something is probably wrong. 2) It could be the fit of your bike. ...


10

If your screw head is actually a nut, like the picture looks like, replace it with a nylock nut. If that is not possible, thread lock fluid like blue Loctite works nicely.


9

I have wrestled with this issue for a long time. After commuting on a Trek FX Hybrid and moving to a Masi Speciale CX Cyclocross bike I am convinced now that Cyclocross bikes make the best commuters. They are built for speed - Let's face it bikes are slower than cars. So when you are out there you want to save as much time as you can. Speed helps. They have ...


9

There's no single answer to this other than "do what works for you". While the optimal answer to this question is to have both a helmet light and one mounted on the bike, not all cyclists have the money to do that. That said, there are a few things that can help you decide, Mac or PC helmet- or handlebar-mounted light: Will you be using more than one bike?...


8

Mountain bikes don't see kickstands for several reasons. One, they are durable. You can lay one down and it's no big deal, certainly not as big a deal as crashing one. Next, when you're out riding terrain, there's almost always something to lean your bike up against like a tree, fence, etc. Also, as you mention, things can get caught in the kickstand. Lastly,...


8

You haven't said what country you're riding in or whether it's on or off-road, and this makes a big legal difference. In the UK at least, if you're riding on the road you must have a white front light on your bike. In addition, the light must be on the centre-line on your bike, or to the off-side of that (i.e. towards the centre of the road). It must not be ...


8

Bicycle Helmet Suitable clothing and shoes Cellphone Whatever else you "need" depends on your mechanical abilities and how independent you wish to be.


7

Markijbema's comment on the original question touched on one aspect that nobody has mentioned: "A seat is easier to combine with a typical dutch bike, which is less race-y than the crazy bikes people in other countries seem to use for daily use" The construction and design of the bicycle determines how well it handles a load, either over the rear wheel, ...


7

I found this image of the first SRM power meter interesting: The crank is rigged up like a lever (rotating around the spindle) - the more forcefully you push the pedal, the more the strain-guage bends, the output of which is used as part of calculating wattage (as is better described in the other answers!) Many modern power-meters are essentially ...


7

Bike parts.com lists them as Sram rotating dual line hooks # BPC 147851.


6

I did some research on this issue and ended up going with a trailer for my two-year old son. We use it for our daily commute to day care and work, and so far it seems comfortable for him, and easy for me to handle. Cars give us plenty of space. My one issue is the amount of time it takes me to get the trailer out of its storage shed, lock up the shed, ...


6

The reflective brand name tab on the rear of that seat bag is a light holder. You will most likely need to remove the light from the seat post. Hopefully it has a clip styled mount, otherwise you can get a light that has a clip mount.


6

In an ideal world, use both. A wide beam light on the handlebar keeps the light on the road in front of you, even when your viewpoint changes, which can save you if an obstacle comes up in front of you in a hurry. However, if the trail curves sharply, and your light is fixed to the handlebar, then the light can be pointed in the wrong direction, which can ...


6

As others have indicated, it depends on both your bike and the type of riding you're doing. If you're just tooling around town (get it, "tooling"?) with no particular destination or schedule, you can probably get away with not much more than a set of tire levers. A pump is handy too so that you don't have to walk your bike to a gas station if you get a ...


6

They're for full fenders. Many disc road and fitness/urban/hybrid bikes now have them here in order to completely avoid strut interference with the brake. To install the fenders neatly I've been mounting the fender, then mounting the struts sticking off into space in the general direction they'll run in from the mount, then bending one with a non-marring ...


6

An obvious disadvantage is shown clearly in the photograph in the question: locks get dirty. I'd rather not have oil, brake dust and general road dirt rubbed all over my clothes.


6

The smaller hole is for Specialized's proprietary "plug and play" fenders, while the larger is for a rear rack. The larger hole can also be used as an alternate mounting point for other types of fenders. For a rear rack on the carbon frame Diverge, it is intended you use the Specialized Rear Rack Seat Collar (second picture), which combines a seat collar ...


6

RoboKaren's answer is great on the pros and cons, so I'll restrict myself to explicitly answering ... why would someone get the seatpost-mounted rack over the frame-mounted rack? Really, the only reason is that your bike won't support a frame-mounted rack: for example because it has rear suspension. In engineering terms, a frame-mounted rack supports ...


5

My suggestions/opinions. Is it worth it to carry a tire patch kit with me in such situations, or pump? It's worth getting tires like Marathon Plus which I hope won't flat, but run well. It's important to keep tires inflated: a good pump at home. How much rain gear should I have, or should I just give up and take the train at the slightest rain? I ...


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