21

The advantages of seat mounted racks are that they don’t require rear dropout rack lugs; some of the seat mount racks have quick release levers so you can easily take them off (while racing or transporting the bike, etc), and are many times the only option for a rear suspension bike. The disadvantages of seat mount racks are numerous: max luggage weight ...


18

It's used for attaching a child seat similar to this one. The above site shows a clearer image of the part in question which might be useful to future visitors.


18

This is what I tell everyone to get first when they get a new bike: Seatbag, to hold the following: Spare tube (maybe two) Small multitool Mini-pump or CO2 inflator Tire patch kit 2x tire levers That assumes you have bidons and cages. Those six things should get you by for many miles and should get you out of any trailside emergencies. As with ...


16

tw: extreme anti-hipster /snark Ahh! The u-lock belt holder. The perfect accessory for hipsters, literally: Advantages: Everyone will know you're a hipster People may think you're into hardcore bondage No ugly plastic u-lock holder marring the beautiful lines of your pristine lacquer-coated steel fixie If you get mugged you have something to fight back ...


13

In my experience cheap lights die, and some more expensive designs are prone to failure. Bike shops sell cheap lights because that's all some people will buy, and better they have a dodgy light than no light (there are enough cyclists without lights already). All the factors you list come down to one or two factors, depending on whether you consider "built ...


13

There are no special requirements for a watch for cycling. A cheap watch from the supermarkt will do as well as a decent quality watch or a sports watch (besides sport-specific functions). Rain or road buzz might damage rather sensitive watches. Fixing a defect, loading the bike, or a crash also gives opportunities to damage a watch. Common sense will ...


12

Why not go for a cheap and simple bicycle speedometer? Apart from the time it can also show you speed and distance which is always nice to know. As gschenk said, there are no special requirements for a watch while bicycling, but I do think that it can get uncomfortable.


10

If your screw head is actually a nut, like the picture looks like, replace it with a nylock nut. If that is not possible, thread lock fluid like blue Loctite works nicely.


9

You haven't said what country you're riding in or whether it's on or off-road, and this makes a big legal difference. In the UK at least, if you're riding on the road you must have a white front light on your bike. In addition, the light must be on the centre-line on your bike, or to the off-side of that (i.e. towards the centre of the road). It must not be ...


9

They're for full fenders. Many disc road and fitness/urban/hybrid bikes now have them here in order to completely avoid strut interference with the brake. To install the fenders neatly I've been mounting the fender, then mounting the struts sticking off into space in the general direction they'll run in from the mount, then bending one with a non-marring ...


8

Bicycle Helmet Suitable clothing and shoes Cellphone Whatever else you "need" depends on your mechanical abilities and how independent you wish to be.


8

Tommaso here. We put them on the fork so riders can install fenders for off road and other adverse weather situations. Hope you enjoy the new Sterrata!


7

RoboKaren's answer is great on the pros and cons, so I'll restrict myself to explicitly answering ... why would someone get the seatpost-mounted rack over the frame-mounted rack? Really, the only reason is that your bike won't support a frame-mounted rack: for example because it has rear suspension. In engineering terms, a frame-mounted rack supports ...


6

Answer: Yes - anything on your helmet may affect its ability to function. Remember the skiing accident that gave Michael Schumacher brain damage? http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/motorsport/formulaone/michael-schumacher/10640839/Michael-Schumacher-skiing-crash-did-helmet-camera-cause-head-injuries.html That was not cycling, but he managed to run his ...


6

An obvious disadvantage is shown clearly in the photograph in the question: locks get dirty. I'd rather not have oil, brake dust and general road dirt rubbed all over my clothes.


6

The smaller hole is for Specialized's proprietary "plug and play" fenders, while the larger is for a rear rack. The larger hole can also be used as an alternate mounting point for other types of fenders. For a rear rack on the carbon frame Diverge, it is intended you use the Specialized Rear Rack Seat Collar (second picture), which combines a seat collar ...


6

The mount is for pannier racks that sit low on your fork. In the absence of this mount I have seen a bracket used, but this is more secure. The rack also mounts using the front axle.


6

I think in most cases there's going to be a better solution than actually doing this, but wing bolts are one way to go. Since most of the accessories brackets in question have recessed holes for the bolts, you may need a spacer of some sort in between, like a presta ring.


5

I used to strap mine to the bike frame, but I have a bike specifically built to facilitate touring with a camera. This is a cheap Manfrotto tripod rather than my expensive one, used while making sure that the idea worked. The camera goes in the black canvas sack above the tripod, BTW. One thing no-one else has mentioned is mounting the tripod vertically ...


5

I will too answer that the best is to have both lights. It's more failsafe but also give you a broader light spread. Different answers point out that lightsources being close to eye level make things look flat and reflection from mist, fog and suspended particles are more an issue, but also, handlebar mounted lights can cause long shadows behind objects not ...


5

A front light needs to have both enough lumens (brightness) and have those lumens pointed in the right places - dictated by the reflector and lens. It also needs a battery (presuming its not dynamo powered) to last the length of the ride with some reserves. Addition things to consider are ease of install and removal from bike and mounting location, and ...


5

For commuting with panniers and/or a toddler seat, I've settled on the front fork for the D-lock, mainly because little else fits there and I'm restricted by cables and tube diameters elsewhere. Having that 1.5kg forwards also helps the handling with a heavy back load. Don't forget that a heavy lock is only around 2% of a rider's weight - it has to be a long ...


5

I'd say it depends on the length of the rack you're going to attach. It's all about the physics - the water droplets, when they detach from the tyre they move perpendicular to the perimeter of the wheel. If the rack is long enough, the droplets that might reach your back are hitting the rack (acting as a mudguard). The ideal situation would be when the ...


5

It's a bracket for holding an old style light like these Photo from Amazon


5

The braze-ons beneath the down tube are traditionally for mounting a third bottle cage. Of course that bottle is more exposed to road dirt than the others, so many people use it for various utility purposes. (You can get water-bottle-shaped repair kits that will fit in there, batteries, air reservoirs for air horns and I'm sure other things as well.) It ...


4

It is certainly true that adding bulk to your helmet has some drawbacks in crashes and such, and consequently warrants some concern. In the incidence of a crash, solid, small objects that are fixed to a specific area of the helmet increase the distribution of force on mounting area, instead of spreading it away from the impact site. However, my ...


4

The Wahoo RFLKT+ is the only device on the market as far as I am aware (and I have looked). As a BTLE user I can tell you you're better off with ANT+; I get far more sensor drops than my ANT+ co-riders.


4

The mainstay tools are really wrenches and allen keys, certainly these will be all you need for something trivial like fitting a rack. But the more you get into things, there are a myriad of different tools around, often which can be used for one and only one task. For example if you want to get the cranks off you need a crank puller, of which there are a ...


4

I'm speaking from personal experience here. Looking at the bicycle from the back. The drive train is on the right side, and when you use the kickstand it leans to the left. When I commute to work, I tend to put my messenger bag with rear rack attachments on the left side. Mostly because the bike is already leaning that way. Once, when I was getting ...


4

I would go for a good floor pump, as I find it can be extremely important in preventing flats. One big problem I see is underinflated tires. This can cause flats and other problems like rim damage. A good floor pump will make it not so much of a chore to ensure your tires are always properly topped up. If you plan on leaving your bike anywhere except your ...


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