14

For use at home, there's no question that separate keys are more useful and more economical. A multi-tool has limitations that make it cumbersome to use in tight spots because all the keys are attached to the tool. Separate keys suffer no such limitation. Separate keys can be bought and replaced individually and very inexpensively -- not so with a multi-...


14

To crudely simplify things, a triathlon/TT bike position is much the same as a road position, but basically "rotated forward", so your arms rest atop the very-low-set bars. A consequence of this is, the seat ends up further forward. (source) Using Chris Froome's TT position as an example, noting the hip position versus the bottom-bracket position: (source ...


11

A front derailer is a bit more complicated than it looks, and can be quite complex to adjust if you're starting from zero -- just having installed the unit. There are five (and a half) adjustments -- Height, sliding up and down the seat tube. Rotation around the seat tube. Low limit High limit Cable tightness Generally height is such that the derailer, ...


8

It sounds like your headset is not adjusted. Your stem cap is used to adjust this. Specifically, the more you tighten the stem cap, the tighter the bearings will get, and the less play you will feel. Here is a picture from Sheldon Brown's article on adjust headsets: My process for checking headset adjustment: Check the headset adjust: Grab the front ...


8

Triathlon bikes are about one thing, and one thing only. Aerodynamics. Dan Empfield, the creator of the Quintana Roo brand, recognized this early on. Cervelo came along soon after, and their designs basically changed how time trial bikes are viewed, with their breakthrough design of the P3 in 2001 (Company history here.) This P3 design evolved, and there ...


8

The B-screw controls the body angle of the derailleur. It pulls the pulleys away from the sprockets, so you don't rub against them. If you set it in the largest rear cog (as you should), when you're adequately clear, you don't have rubbing. Its a somewhat insensitive adjustment once you clear the cogs, but the closer you are to the loosest screw value ...


8

I noticed the same thing when I first got a B17. I fiddled with various angles and so forth, but in the end I found it's mainly just a matter of getting used to the smoother feel of leather as compared to the plastic you're used to. You slide over leather more easily, especially if you wear typical bike shorts, and this gives you the sensation that you're ...


8

It lengthens or shortens the housing length to adjust the lateral position of the derailleur cage. It's used to adjust derailleur 'indexing' so that the chain sits properly on the cassette sprockets. Mountain bike shifter units have barrel adjusters, road bikes use this one as well as having frame mounted or 'in-line' adjusters some where on the housing run....


8

Sounds like you are adjusting the position of the wheel axle in the frame drop outs to move the rotor relative to the caliper. Your weight and the forces generated going over bumps will push the axle fully into the dropouts, that's why you are getting rub after every ride. The calipers have an adjustment mechanism and that's how you should adjust the ...


7

A problem many hit when trying to straighten the stem is that they end up aligning the stem with the bike while the wheel is almost straight. A degree or two isn't noticeable until you are riding and then it really bothers you. Instead of trying to align three things (bike, stem, wheel), turn the wheel about 45 degrees. Now align the stem (I generally do it ...


7

In short It is part of the design on the bike but if a bike has been damaged the stability of the handlebars gets worse. Personal experience In many years of riding (Dutch) bikes I have noticed a distinct different in how they handle when you only guide the handlebars rather than holding them. When looking at the bikes I could not see enough of a difference ...


7

Replacing a chain on a drivetrain that was previously well tuned will not take it out of alignment. Provided that the new chain is the same width and number of links as the old one and that the cassette and chainring aren't worn, no further work is required.


6

It sounds as if you adjusted the barrel adjuster out too far, the last time you adjusted it, and damaged the threads on the adjuster. When the shop cleans and lubes it, it is fine for a few days, and then gets stuck again, because the threads are cross threaded or stripped. If the damage is relatively minor, it can act normal until it is under a little ...


6

Adjustable stems follow a couple different design schemes, all of which involve some interlocking toothy bits that hold the angle in place. If the angle isn't changing, the toothy bits are still locked together. There's probably a bolt on the underside of the stem extension. If so, that's what locks the angle adjustment in place. So you loosen the side ...


6

I think what you are saying is that you need to drop the seat post all the way down into the frame, so the saddle is as close to the frame as possible. You need a seat post to connect the saddle and frame. You can't attach the saddle directly to the frame. If the post cannot be slid all the way into the frame due to an obstruction it can be cut down to ...


5

Tip of the day for how to adjust brakes so they dont rub when tightened: Use shims on either side of the disk! Here's how to do it: Get a beer can and cut a strip about an inch wide and 6 inches long (careful when using this, it's sharp) Take the wheel off the bike, loosen up the hex cap bolts on top of the calliper, not the wheel, adaptor, etc Put the ...


5

The pain at the top of the kneecap is classical patellofemoral pain syndrome -- the most common knee problem. The most direct treatment is simple strengthening exercises for the secondary muscles supporting the knee joint so that the kneecap remains properly positioned -- such exercises can provide relief in 48 hours or less in some cases. But you should ...


5

As @Batman says, 2mm is VERY little clearance on a bike. It is more likely to be the frame flexing (more so the chain and seat stays) causing the tyre to move around a bit. I would see if there is a way to mount the stand a little further forward on its bracket. You want to create as much distance as you can between your stand and the tyre as possible. ...


5

If there's no barrel adjuster, then you'll need one installed. Ask LBS to do that or do it yourself: Get an inline barrel adjuster and two 4mm ferrules. These are pretty cheap. Get tools to cut cable housing. Make sure there is enough shifting cable left to accomodate extra 3-4 centimeters added by adjuster. If it's too short, get a new cable. Detach cable ...


5

If you are looking for pedalling performance, adjusting the seatpost (up and down) and the seat (back and front) is the answer. There are literature about adjusting seatpost so you can look them up on the internet; youtube also have many video demonstration. Adjusting handlebar height is more about efficiency. In general: the less up-right position, the ...


5

This is normal. The procedure is called trimming. It allows you to move the front derailleur cage a bit to prevent the derailleur cage rubbing on the chain due to the changing angle of the chain when shifting in the rear.


5

They grow so fast it really doesn't matter, but if the kid looks too low then they are, so go up a bit. Rider should be able to stand over the seat with both feet on the ground. While some balance bikes have bike seats with clamps like this, they're in the minority for cost and weight reasons. This wooden frame is far more common and much lighter for the ...


5

Stability of a bicycle is mostly determined by its geometry: primarily the wheel diameter, wheelbase and front fork geometry. If the rider is not touching the handlebar it has very little effect (its mass and rotational inertia do have some effect). When a bicycle is moving there is a force trying to align the front wheel with the direction of travel. This ...


5

I usually just grab the pad with my fingers, and carefully apply torque in the opposite direction of the torque I apply to the screw. The two torques must be roughly equal (very roughly), if you apply too much torque to the pad, you are going to turn it the opposite direction. It is not enough to grab the pad and try to hold it in place, you have to apply ...


5

Shimano BR-MT520 brakes are hydraulic discs. The alignment can be adjusted by loosening the two mounting bolts. The bolts typically have Torx T25 size heads, so you need a basic T25 wrench at least. If your rear caliper is mounted between the seat and chain stays the bolts can be difficult to get to, so a L-shaped rather than a T-shaped wrench is necessary. ...


4

This approach works well for rigid forks and might work well for suspension forks too. You need a straightedge or aluminium profile. Put the straightedge through the wheel and push it against the fork: Ensure you do not stress the spokes, though it might help clamping the straightedge. Look down from your handlebar and align the straightedge with the ...


4

Lever throw is how much the lever moves in total. Cable slack is how slack the cable is, ie. how much you have to pull before the brake pads start moving. Park Tool says: Squeeze lever to test caliper brake. Adjust lever modulation setting by moving pads inward or outward from rotor by using both pad-adjusting knobs. To maintain the 2:1 ratio, turn the ...


4

After making sure your handlebar is properly centered in the stem clamp and it is not bent (from a crash for example) locate the bike over the lines of a straight and well installed tiled floor. Use the crossed pattern as a guide: Align the front wheel with lengthwise lines and compare the handlebar ends with a crossed line. As the Handlebar halves are ...


4

I measured five quill stems that I have, three steel and two aluminum. The overall lengths vary from 5 1/2 to 6 1/4". The minimum insertion length was 2.5 to 3.0 inches. There was not a consistant ratio of length to minimum insertion. It is possible that the insertion length increased on newer bikes due to safety/liability concerns. If you haven't got at ...


4

It is the black piece about 2 inches from where it enters the down tube. That is the barrel adjuster, but in line adjusters can be difficult get started adjusting, as often they come from the factory with the 2 halves of the barrel adjuster turned tightly against each other. That makes it appear to do nothing, when in fact the reason it is doing nothing ...


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