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15

I believe your bike has a double crankset with 50-34 chainrings. The general advice is to attempt to avoid cross-chaining, i.e. avoid the big ring and biggest 2-3 cogs in the rear, and avoid the small ring and smallest 2-3 cogs in the rear. There is actually some empirical testing that shows that these combinations create higher friction in the drivetrain, ...


9

No, that person was confused and you have it right. A new 700x25 tire will fit the same as what you have. Often 40 year old wheels will need new rim strips while you're at it.


5

To answer your second question, you can think of the chainrings as your high range and low range, and the sprockets on your cassette as your position inside the range. These ranges overlap a lot. You'll want to experiment a little (and it will depend on your exact gearing setup), but when you're in (or near) your little-little combination and you want to ...


4

It looks like at least one company makes a headset that will allow you to fit a tapered steerer in some straight 1⅛" head tubes, but pulling the old headset and installing a new one will be an added expense. The brake's actuation method doesn't really matter, but you want to find a fork with the right mounting points for your brake. Your existing brakes ...


4

Whenever you are not aiming for riding in a race, go for serious puncture proof tires. Especially if you are a casual rider who can't just fix a flat within 10min on the road side. I certainly can't, even though I've patched enough tires for a lifetime. You are not going to get significant enjoyment out of being able to ride 0.1km/h faster, but you are going ...


4

This is a potentially complex question, because we don't know exactly what 70% tarmac and 30% light gravel means. Light gravel might mean a dirt or crushed limestone road, or it might mean smaller bits of gravel. A roadie might think of light gravel differently from an MTBer. Consider the surface Cyclingtips recently proposed a grading system for gravel. I'm ...


4

Are you physically near the seller? The single best thing you can do is go see it, inspect it closely, and then get a leg over the bike. Test Ride That way you'll know instantly if its a "no-way" fit bit sitting over the bike. A good seller will let you take it for a ride too. Ideally an hour, with some mixed surfaces, and a small climb/descent to get ...


3

For what it's worth, the way I ride is I start off in small ring and then change up to big ring once I hit the middle of the cassette. So around the 18/21t mark. Depending on how fast I'm decelerating/accelerating, I sometimes have to change up or down on the cassette to compensate for the front change. That seems to be a 'feature' of riding with a ...


3

As Adam says there is several ratios overlap between the ratios available in the small and large rings, so you can change from the large to small chainring, then 3 sprocket up in the rear and be in approximately the same ratio overall. It's a good idea to anticipate which chainring you'll want to be in for the section or road or trail coming up. I run in ...


3

Broken axles are an inherent feature of the 'freewheel' hub design. They happen because the load from wheel bearings is close to center, where it has more leverage than closer to axle ends. Newer 'freehub' cassette designs solve the problem with either having bearings inside the cassette close to axle end or with oversized axle. The best option would be ...


2

There are far too many options and it's far too subjective for someone to give you a straight "get this bike" answer. You're kind of talking about the "All Mountain" to "Enduro" range of bikes. Ie bikes that can go long distance but can also go downhill. The all mountain type bikes typically start at 140mm-ish travel. The cube you link is one of these. ...


2

Criggie has made some great points. In an attempt to be additive - tagging on to the "Tyre" portion of his comments. Your first consideration when selecting a bicycle is on how you will use it. Once you match your usage to a type of bike then it's time to get the best value for your money. One should take into account the type of roads you will be riding ...


1

The best option is to acquire a new rear wheel that is equipped with a more modern freehub that accepts cassette sprocket clusters. The freehub puts the bearings more outboard and that helps prevent bent axles because there now isn't such a long stretch of axle unsupported like is found in the right side of freewheel systems. Your bike is likely a 2002 ...


1

I'm going to attempt to approach the question a different way than the other two answers. This issue has been on my mind for a bit. Note that the answer refers to my experience in the US a lot. I do so only because I live in the US; the things I discuss likely go on elsewhere, but I'm not as aware of dynamics in other parts of the world. Basically, certain ...


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