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22

While specific shopping comparison questions are off-topic here due to their tendency to become obsolete, there is a perfectly good generic question here where these two bikes can be used as examples, so I will take that angle on it. The two bikes in question have similar price points, but the braking system on the disc one is eating a lot more of the price ...


15

You've got off to a great start, well done. Several answers tell you how to improve quickly, and they're not wrong. But you'll see plenty of improvement just by riding often, occasionally pushing yourself, and resting when you feel the need after a hard effort. Riding daily to work/school/college if reasonable, with something for fun some weekends is hugely ...


14

You almost certainly have a 7 or 8 speed freewheel hub. They can do this, especially 8. Google those terms along with broken axles. 8 speed freewheel hubs had some years of prominence circa 2000-2001 and then were rejected by the industry because of these problems. They have now made a return due to manufacturers answering the pressure to fit so many other ...


12

For Germany, the go-to answer is to buy the ADFC-Radtourenkarte for your region, and use that to get ideas where nice bike routes are located. The advantages of these cards are numerous: They use a scale that's suitable to biking, 1:150'000. A bike is about 5 times as fast as a pedestrian, and a car is 3 to 4 times faster than a bike. As such, car maps are ...


10

I'm going to focus solely on the issue of mechanical disc versus rim brakes. All else equal, I would prefer rim brakes to mechanical disc. Mechanical disc brakes (and the hubs, and possibly the frame as well due to increased manufacturing complexity) are more expensive than rim brakes. This means that if the bikes have the same price, then the one with disc ...


10

It never gets easier, you just go faster. — Greg Lemond It actually sounds like you are doing great, that 30km ride was 50% longer than your previous largest ride which is pretty significant. Just sticking with it is a big part of the equation here but, there are lots of training plans out there like https://www.cyclingweekly.com/fitness/training/cycling-...


9

The rough side should face the frame dropout. The roughness is designed to increase friction with the frame dropouts. This type of knurling works because the frame dropouts are un-hardened, either low-allow steel or aluminum. On the other hand the knurled washer is probably hardened (or at least harder) steel. Thus the knurling can 'bite' into the softer ...


9

You could use Komoot, which is an app and a website which can give you recommended rides around your area and you can plan your own. On the discover page of Komoot you can search routes in your area and/or filter by region and categories (seasons, type of biking, etc...)


8

If you have a lot of thorns around, slime is probably not going to save you. Perhaps tubeless tyres mounted in a tubeless setup could, but they are more complicated and potentially incompatible with your old rims. Tubeless also uses something like slime (most often a latex-based sealant) but it all works much better, because there is more solid rubber in a ...


8

An approach that works well if you have a good memory. Just go out and ride. Memorize the route while riding. When you feel like you don't want to ride more than the same distance again, just turn back and ride the same route in reverse to your home. Next time, you can start in the same route but turn differently in some turn. Gradually you'll start to build ...


8

I put the Tannus Tire Liners in with my tubes. They are very lightweight, but do not compress easily, so if there is a puncture, you can still ride on them to get back: I'll report back on their true performance, if I ever get a flat, but I put these in my tubeless tires & rims (swapped out the stems) because they provide greater puncture protection, ...


8

I don't know about Germany specifically, but I used to use Strava for finding places to ride. If you have an account, you can go to Explore and select Segment Explore. You can move around the map and it will show you segments that people have uploaded. Its a good way of finding popular places for cycling, although they can often be places where people go to ...


7

I've never tried an anti puncture lining, so can't comment on those. But my experience with slime tubes is that you still get a puncture and now also have the added hassle of slime all over everything. The correct solution to this problem is to use proper tubeless tyres and sealant, however even though this is now a well established technology for MTB, may ...


7

There is one other possibility that bears mentioning: If the hub is somehow deformed, such that the bearing cups are not "square" to the axle, then the rotation of the hub can tend to "grab" the cones and turn them on the axle. This can increasingly tighten the cone and increase the tension on the axle, causing it to snap. I had a front ...


7

Cycling Weekly has lots of great articles. This may sound strange, but make full blast sprinting a part of your training. Usually a person gets tired because they don’t have enough oxygen moving into their legs. Sprinting works the great muscles of your upper legs. It doesn’t have to be a 1k sprint or anything like that. Just go flat out for a couple hundred ...


6

Fundamentally, you will see improvement by gradually increasing either the time or intensity of your riding. Ideally, you should focus more on the time and intensity (perceived effort) of your rides and less on speed/distance. This is for two reasons; firstly, route choice and weather can make a big difference to your speed. Secondly, when you worry about ...


6

I would like to add CyclOSM to the recommendations: https://www.cyclosm.org/ This layer for Open Street Maps will show you a lot of useful information for planning your own bike tours. If you also want this layer paired with a router you can use: https://bikerouter.de/ A router is a program that finds a route according to your preferences. Here you can read ...


5

I would say they (both posts) are most likely either being intentionally misleading or they don't actually know what kind of bike they have. Looking at their the 2016 Defy 1, it seems to be disk only, and be specced with 105 level components. Even going back to 2013 which is as far back as Giant's site seems to go back, it's still speced with 105 level ...


5

The paint scheme looks like that of the 2009 Giant Defy Advanced 1 Check out https://www.bicyclebluebook.com/value-guide/product/3050124/ bikepedia.com and bicylebluebook.com have lots of info on bikes by year and model. Here's the 2010 Giant Defy 1, which again looks very similar, with a few minor differences in the paint scheme: https://www.bicyclebluebook....


5

For the bike, don’t worry about it as long as it at your size and properly adjusted, if you do mostly roads and parks. The most important is to enjoy doing it. You mentioned riding with friends, then it might better to have a bike of a similar kind than your friends (road, gravel, MTB), but it's not a requirement. The answer depends also on what you’d like ...


4

This is quite a wide-ranging question with a number of points raised. Regarding the specific question of mechanical vs. sidepull, I can only agree with the previous commenters that you are likely to get better value and experience from the sidepull brakes, from my experience they are much easier to keep 'in tune' than disk brakes and will almost certainly ...


4

The ultimate marker of how durable a paint finish is is to see how easily it chips :) You can’t really predict how durable the paint will be. Since paint is a type of coating, it is subject to a vast variety of factors such as the cleanliness of the aluminum, surface roughness, primer choice, painting technique, etc. There isn’t a highly identifiable ...


3

In addition to the answers you already have, it sounds perfectly possible that the bike was stolen in the past, even if the person currently selling it is unaware and bought it in good faith. You might want to check if your country operates anything like the UK's immobilise or smart water, both are schemes aimed at tracking and tracing stolen property. I ...


3

What is a possible fix for this problem? Loctite. Blue. I have an FSA-based SRM power meter where the self-extracting crank bolt simply will not stay properly torqued without using Loctite. That's probably pretty similar to the problems you're having. And I'm not backpedaling or skidding with that bike... I bought the SRM crankset used, so maybe it was ...


3

First, don’t worry about being fit before getting a better bike, if you can afford one. Once you have a better bike you’ll wonder how you got along without it before. Second, as far as your distance concern goes, don’t stress about it. Push yourself hard, but don’t overdo it and be sure to allow your body to recover between rides. The less conditioned you ...


3

If your balance might be an issue now, then a trike makes a lot of sense. The front end is like a regular bike, so you can have a basket. And the rear has a low platform or tray between the rear wheels for carrying other things. I would not recommend any bolt-on stabiliser wheels (big training wheels) because 3 wheels can all touch the ground, whereas 4 ...


3

The question rules out a trailer in this case, but it's not hard to do, so here it is for completeness. The trailer below was converted from a child-carrying trailer, with a length of aluminium extrusion on top and straps. That's a 24" wheel kids bike behind my commuter, and it handled very well on a test ride. It's not quite finished (I'd like ...


3

When I got back into cycling, I would find a destination with some reason for going there, and as long as I wasn't moving something large/heavy/fragile, then the bike was a valid solution. With a start/end and a single waypoint I could then look at the roads joining the two points, and pick out features to avoid (motorways/highways, certain intersections, ...


3

Two websites I use to find routes are RideWithGPS (for road and off-road rides) and TrailForks (for mountain biking). I've also used RideWithGPS to plan my own routes; I'm not sure if TrailForks can do something similar, I just use it to find trails. I just checked, they both have rides available in Germany. Both websites are also available as mobile apps. ...


3

I suggest you to have a look at brouter.de . Not immediate, but extremely useful and based on OpenStreetMap data, it allows you to correctly consider (possible) heavy traffic and ground quality (tarmac, gravel, bare earth and roots? all these infos can be made available).


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