64

It is a known psychological fallacy (sunk costs fallacy) that already having spent too much resources (time, money…) on something that turned out to be a mistake somehow justifies persisting in doing that instead of switching to something else. Because it is irrational, it is hard to use rational logic to persuade. Maybe pointing out that the very feeling ...


24

I would simply steer away of the bike vs car perspective, as people will instantly start obsessing over two metrics: cost and speed. Neither of these capture some of the true benefits of cycling. I would also be careful to steer away from any language that could implying that they have been making a "poor choice" by owning and maintaining a car. Rather, I ...


17

My case is a particularly striking example: I would have to pay £8 per day to park. Plus another couple of pounds on fuel. I have a collection of bikes, but one that's perfectly adequate for this journey cost less than a single week's parking (second hand). Another week's parking gets a helmet and basic lights, and after that it's as good as free money. ...


13

The "early start" allows cyclists to clear the junction ahead of motorists, this is useful for cyclists making off-side turns (right in the UK, left in the US). It also helps cyclists going straight on avoid conflict with motorists making near-side turns (left in the UK, right in the US). The UK and many places in Europe have Advanced Stop Lines (Highway ...


9

There is the practical reason that for the first 2-3 seconds of riding the bike is generally unstable, and the ability to hold a steady course is limited. Trying to get the bike moving while cars are whizzing past within inches is definitely unnerving and possibly risky. (And cars will tend to pass closer to a standing bike than a moving one.)


9

Be the change that you want to see in the world I can't justify riding my bike into work if I'm investing so much money on my car in the first place That is a totally bogus argument both for them to make and for you to refute. Frankly, I cannot for the life of me imagine any adult person actually believing that. It sounds more like a tongue-in-cheek joke ...


8

Velodromes are not a suitable cycling venue for members of the general public. They require specialized equipment (e.g., higher bottom brackets to avoid pedal strikes), training (e.g., no moving up/down track without ensuring you have room, maintaining enough speed in corners), and discipline. Expecting untrained riders and/or unsupervised novices to ride ...


7

This may not seem very concrete to you, but if you think about it, it is very powerful indeed. Imagine a collision between a car and a bike. With no such law in place you might expect there to be some argument about whose fault it was etc. etc. and as cyclists we all know from experience who's likely to come off worst... However you put such a law in place ...


7

If people actually find coming by car slightly more comfortable/enjoyable, then the money they spent actually is an investment. Therefore the sunk cost argument is not neccesarily a fallacy. Furthermore, even if it were, you will not likely get people on your side by proclaiming that they follow a fallacy. Hence, it I would approach the situation as follows: ...


6

Honestly, I don't think that a velodrome would accomplish what you are intending, taking the public from the streets to the track. Riding on the banks of a velodrome (Unless it's wide/long such as the 'drome at the end of Paris-Roubaix) is an accomplished skill, so what I'm afraid you'd have is a bunch of riders doing laps at the bottom of the track. Also, ...


5

I have not read all answers and comments so I might have missed a link already here, but I think this is the best site for for arguments about all to do with cycling and road safety. On the right hand site you will find many internal links to posts in themes, like 'what works' or 'cycle paths' I am not able to give you useful quotes from each of the links ...


5

Basically for the same reasons that advanced stop lines exist - puts the bike where it can be seen by drivers setting off, rather than risk being sideswiped in a blind spot. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_stop_line#Safety_aspects


5

One halfway compromise is to suggest they drive 95% of the way to work, park in a all-day free carpark, then ride the last 5%. They're less likely to be sweaty after a short ride, and its a good start. Getting the bike in/out of the car can be a challenge, so I have a couple folding bikes that I lend out. Or they can use a towball/trunk/boot mounted ...


4

I agree with k102 in response above. I commute to work everyday on a two-lane county road. I try to make myself as visible to motorists as possible. At stop lights, I coast in front of the line of cars (maybe 5 feet if there is room. Taking off at the other directions red light gives me time to get my momentum up and hopefully a chance for the motorists to ...


4

If these people value their cars so much and are concerned about the money spent on it, cycling to work at least some times makes even more sense! By cycling, one prolongs the lifespan of the car with less wear and tear. So they should spend less on servicing over the same period of time, less on petrol and less on city commute taxes if applicable. They ...


3

I wanted to update contributors and thank you for the input. The biggest grocer stores, namely Publix and Kroger has Media Relations staff that gobbled up the idea. Bike parking is low investment and has a big payback in PR! It helped ripping this image from the latest NACTO Bicycle Design Guide and emailing it with my communications (email, phone call ...


3

The most practical approach we found for larger posters was trailers. Like this They're somewhat inclined to fall over in the wind so you have to be a little cautious, but the group who were using them lent them out to a range of people without any problems (other than getting the trailers back afterwards). You can attach the same A frames to a loadbike if ...


2

The table/graph "Preferred separation of bicycles and motor vehicles" (Ausroads, 2009) as visible here (Australian Bicycling Council, Cycling on Higher Speed Roads When to Provide for Bicycles on Higher Speed Roads) on page 2: http://www.austroads.com.au/abc/images/pdf/ns1525_fs_one.pdf indicates that the Australian standard for introducing cycle lanes (...


2

Cycle! Be the example that leads people to ask questions about why they don't ride. Not in a pushy way, but just through lived experience. When you're meeting people somewhere, turn up on your bike. Park it right next to your destination, go in. If it's raining, take your bike on the train with the other train users. Show that there's no need to be a purist ...


2

I would think the best would be to attach to a rear rack. The posters could stick up above the top of the rack, occupying maybe 3 vertical feet. Width would be limited by heel clearance issues -- probably about 18 inches. You could also put small posters on the front wheel, mounted to a front rack. And there can be a poster in the triangle between the ...


2

This an old thread with an accepted answer; the consensus is against the idea. So here is a dissenting view. In my city (Melbourne, Australia), there are seven velodromes that are open to the public. Access is always with personal responsibility. These open (to the public and to the sky) facilities see fairly constant use, and regular club use. Most of ...


2

I have seen quite a few bikes with a piece of plastic in the front triangle attached with wire or zip-ties. It was a thicker kind of plastic, kind of like they make binders out of. I couldn't find a picture of one so I MSPainted what it might look like:


2

The "dirt" magazine (137/july 2013) has a small article on that. Possible jobs listed are: working in a bike shop pro rider writer (in mags, web) photographer guide (riding instructor) industry related (designer, marketing) So, you'd need to find out which of the above you are best at and start contacting people, sending cvs etc.


2

Bicycle parking is a convenience but it is never a factor in my decision on if a ride my bike. Worse case I lock my bike to the smoking bench. At my gym I have a secure bike room so I will ride my nice bike. But if I did not have the room I would still ride my beater. Now a good bike route is a factor. If you want to encourage biking then work with ...


2

Petrol is not a sunk cost. Every mile you travel in a car costs money on petrol. Even if the rest of it is money you've already spent, you're still saving money on petrol. And it saves money on a gym membership too. :)


2

Here's a story that I think wins people over: I usually just bike in a few days a week, and those are my best days. When I drive, I get stuck in traffic and I end up coming into work feeling dull. When I bike into work, I get my heart going and I feel all warmed up and ready to tackle the day. Biking home is the best part because I get home with more ...


1

In addition to the list @cherouvim posted, you could also get a job as a bike messenger if you live in a large enough city and are exceptionally crazy.


1

You might consider sharing bike parking information from other cities of similar sizes. Here's one to check http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/99190 Maybe showing them something would help. Another idea is to contact bike advocacy groups in nearby towns and ask them their strategies.


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