63

It is a known psychological fallacy (sunk costs fallacy) that already having spent too much resources (time, money…) on something that turned out to be a mistake somehow justifies persisting in doing that instead of switching to something else. Because it is irrational, it is hard to use rational logic to persuade. Maybe pointing out that the very feeling ...


24

I would simply steer away of the bike vs car perspective, as people will instantly start obsessing over two metrics: cost and speed. Neither of these capture some of the true benefits of cycling. I would also be careful to steer away from any language that could implying that they have been making a "poor choice" by owning and maintaining a car. Rather, I ...


17

My case is a particularly striking example: I would have to pay £8 per day to park. Plus another couple of pounds on fuel. I have a collection of bikes, but one that's perfectly adequate for this journey cost less than a single week's parking (second hand). Another week's parking gets a helmet and basic lights, and after that it's as good as free money. ...


9

Be the change that you want to see in the world I can't justify riding my bike into work if I'm investing so much money on my car in the first place That is a totally bogus argument both for them to make and for you to refute. Frankly, I cannot for the life of me imagine any adult person actually believing that. It sounds more like a tongue-in-cheek joke ...


7

If people actually find coming by car slightly more comfortable/enjoyable, then the money they spent actually is an investment. Therefore the sunk cost argument is not neccesarily a fallacy. Furthermore, even if it were, you will not likely get people on your side by proclaiming that they follow a fallacy. Hence, it I would approach the situation as follows: ...


6

I have not read all answers and comments so I might have missed a link already here, but I think this is the best site for for arguments about all to do with cycling and road safety. On the right hand side you will find many internal links to posts in themes, like 'what works' or 'cycle paths' I am not able to give you useful quotes from each of the links as ...


5

One halfway compromise is to suggest they drive 95% of the way to work, park in a all-day free carpark, then ride the last 5%. They're less likely to be sweaty after a short ride, and its a good start. Getting the bike in/out of the car can be a challenge, so I have a couple folding bikes that I lend out. Or they can use a towball/trunk/boot mounted ...


4

If these people value their cars so much and are concerned about the money spent on it, cycling to work at least some times makes even more sense! By cycling, one prolongs the lifespan of the car with less wear and tear. So they should spend less on servicing over the same period of time, less on petrol and less on city commute taxes if applicable. They ...


3

I wanted to update contributors and thank you for the input. The biggest grocer stores, namely Publix and Kroger has Media Relations staff that gobbled up the idea. Bike parking is low investment and has a big payback in PR! It helped ripping this image from the latest NACTO Bicycle Design Guide and emailing it with my communications (email, phone call ...


2

Bicycle parking is a convenience but it is never a factor in my decision on if a ride my bike. Worse case I lock my bike to the smoking bench. At my gym I have a secure bike room so I will ride my nice bike. But if I did not have the room I would still ride my beater. Now a good bike route is a factor. If you want to encourage biking then work with ...


2

This an old thread with an accepted answer; the consensus is against the idea. So here is a dissenting view. In my city (Melbourne, Australia), there are seven velodromes that are open to the public. Access is always with personal responsibility. These open (to the public and to the sky) facilities see fairly constant use, and regular club use. Most of ...


2

Here's a story that I think wins people over: I usually just bike in a few days a week, and those are my best days. When I drive, I get stuck in traffic and I end up coming into work feeling dull. When I bike into work, I get my heart going and I feel all warmed up and ready to tackle the day. Biking home is the best part because I get home with more ...


2

Petrol is not a sunk cost. Every mile you travel in a car costs money on petrol. Even if the rest of it is money you've already spent, you're still saving money on petrol. And it saves money on a gym membership too. :)


1

As some of the comments pointed out, saying something like "it's not economically viable to bike" is sometimes a cover for "I'm scared to bike" or some other concern. Lots of ppl are scared to bike for various reasons. Scared of being hit by car, or the more self-conscious fear of trying out a new physical activity in a public sphere, or just unsure about ...


1

It kind of makes sense for one person. But if that person is living in a household with others, you might shift this topic. How many cars do they have right now? Two? Maybe one would be enough if at least one would switch to cycling to work. That one car would run more Ks, but you will save 50% on all fixed costs. And instead of two old cars, you might even ...


1

This is the "sunk cost fallacy". What makes a future decision NOW has nothing to do with what you already spent if there is no way to get that money back. Suppose I don't own a car, but I own a bicycle. It costs me $0 for gas to ride my bike, and I probably can "park" it for free to. So the cost to ride a bike to work is $0. Now I buy a car for, say, $20,...


1

When I was in college I had three housemates in a 2-bedroom apartment. I was the only one who biked. I stored my bike in my bedroom on a "bike pole," elevated about my dresser. It was a huge conversation piece. My roommate saw me lift my bike onto the bike pole multiple times per week, and guests were always intrigued with my storage solution. A year after ...


1

You might consider sharing bike parking information from other cities of similar sizes. Here's one to check http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/99190 Maybe showing them something would help. Another idea is to contact bike advocacy groups in nearby towns and ask them their strategies.


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