12

That is your bike's first "war wound" and should not compromise the integrity at all. It is disappointing to have a new-thing and is now no-longer showroom clean, but that's life - keep enjoying your bike. Any bike that gets used will acquire chips and scratches, scuffs and memories over time. The bike grows character as these accumulate. Just ...


4

There's a lot more to unpack in the materials used for bikes. The terms steel, aluminum and alloy are all vague names that don't actually describe the material being used. "Steel" frames can either mean hi-tens steel that you'll find in big box stores or a steel alloy that you read about on mtb websites such as chromoly (chromium-molybdenum) or ...


4

I recently read that aluminum bikes are as heavy as steel bikes: Builders usually make the aluminum tubes larger and thicker to make it stronger, which adds extra weight and makes it heavier just like the steel ones. This is not generally true in my experience. A identical frame with the same stiffness will be lighter in aluminum. Steel does damp more ...


3

I think the key word here is "First mountain bike" You've not said what kind of riding you want to do - a MTB for cross country riding, or around a flat dirt path with the kids. Could be commuting on poor roads where you think you need suspension. I suggest you focus on something that costs well below your maximum budget. Whether that is steel or ...


3

For mountain bikes, I'm not really sure there's a choice, for a new bike at least: from a quick search from some manufacturers, the offer in steel is really marginal, and most of the offering is about bikepacking bikes (niche products then, that I wouldn't recommend for a first bike). Another way to answer the question is to look at the manufacturer's ...


2

Thanks guys. I scraped off the paint to the raw aluminium out of curiosity. Still not sure if it is a dent or just an optical illusion. From certain angles/ lighting, it looks like there is a slight depression; from other angles/ lighting, it looks completely flat. Running across the portion with a sharp pick to "feel" for any indentation also ...


2

Location is close to where tensile stress are strongest (i.e. where the frame must be strong), but I would not worry about such a small dent unless it is a competition frame (i.e. it may be very light because material usage have een optimized ... and therefore any excess stress will shorten the frame life). Luckily for you, that is a perfect dent: its ...


1

Usually aluminum frames of equivalent quality are slightly lighter weight. Not much, but you can measure the weight difference. Also today, due to economies of scale, aluminum frames are usually somewhat cheaper. Sure, you could compare a butted thin-wall high-strength steel frame and the cheapest aluminum frame you can find that doesn't have butted tubes. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible